Monday, July 14, 2014

No Downside, at All!

There is no downside to the homesteading life! Living close to the land allows you to go grocery shopping in the backyard for the best, healthiest, and tastiest food in the world! Here is my little farm's morning haul: three cucumbers, goat milk, fresh berries, new potatoes, salad greens, basil, half a dozen eggs and kale!

What is in your backyard this morning to eat?! Share with the blog please! I'd love to hear more from the readers, I really would. So if you read along and garden or raise stock - let the readership know! And if you don't but really would like to some day, let us know why and ask how to get started, as a community we can all help each other out with advice and ideas. Comment away!

51 Comments:

Blogger barbsbirds13 said...

Stunning assortment of leaves and flowers (calendula, nasturtium, red clover) for salad, new potatoes, yet another picking of peas in pods, raspberries, blueberries, currants, and a zuke. Of course, kales, and herbs: oregano, cilantro, chervil, parsley, arugula. For teas and tinctures, yarrow, lemon balm, nettle, raspberry leaf, feverfew, pepperming, spearmint. And the daily cackle berries.

July 14, 2014 at 10:00 AM  
Blogger ebwhite said...

Fresh from the garden -- eggplant, basil, and tomatoes.

July 14, 2014 at 10:06 AM  
Blogger Jenna said...

Nice work, Barb and Eb!

July 14, 2014 at 10:08 AM  
Blogger Becca said...

Still in an apartment where my sad little patio garden is getting flooded out daily by the lawn sprinklers. So, I have nothing to harvest anymore. But, fingers are crossed that soon enough we'll be in a house with land and I can plant to my heart's content. Also hoping there are brambles in the woods on the property. That would be delightful to pick berries that didn't taste of plastic.

July 14, 2014 at 10:10 AM  
Blogger Maria Crispell said...

Sugar snap peas, basil, dill, sage, lettuce, arugula, first tomato!, goat milk, duck and chicken eggs.

July 14, 2014 at 10:12 AM  
Blogger Karen said...

Salad greens, kale, eggs, blueberries and raspberries, tomatoes. I'll start digging the potatoes soon, and I really wish the cucumbers would get with the program and catch up to the tomatoes so I can have a proper salad.

July 14, 2014 at 10:20 AM  
Blogger sweetifer said...

I chipped the parsley after it had gone to seed and silly me, used it to mulch most of the beds. Between forests of parsley there are tomatoes, kale, arugula, cilantro, carrots, beets, raspberries, chard, potatoes, mint, basil, oregano, leeks...

We have a motto about weeds, "It's all biomass." and almost any plant can be composted and contribute to the health of the soil. We're taking a permaculture approach and working on creating a food forest, but this year we'll be more careful about where mature seeds end up.

July 14, 2014 at 10:21 AM  
Blogger farm foreman said...

Raspberries for breakfast, basil and fresh garlic enough last night for the season's first pesto. Later today we'll have kale and cucumbers, and thyme to flavor tonight's chicken. Nettle, feverfew, lemon balm and chocolate mint for tea. Going out to the rented field to see if the rye is ready!

July 14, 2014 at 10:22 AM  
Blogger Shadawyn said...

In the last 24 hours: insane amounts of green beans, peas, kale, swiss chard, lettuce, squash, chamomile, raspberries, wild blackberries and thimbleberries, beets, basil in mass and assorted other herbs in moderation....

The lady birds have not yet laid their eggs this morning (it's only 7:30AM), but we should get a handful later on and still have half a dozen in the fridge.

July 14, 2014 at 10:31 AM  
Blogger Alix said...

Lettuce, Rhubarb, Kale, and Sorrel currently. Potatoes, and peas very soon. Everything else is good and late this year, so we are hoping for a long September! Zone 3 gardening does definitely have its challenges.

July 14, 2014 at 10:43 AM  
Blogger margaret minetti said...

kale, strawberries,peas in the pod, greenbeans almost ready, and green peppers starting to show small fruit, as well as lots of green onions.

July 14, 2014 at 10:46 AM  
Blogger rain said...

I picked my first tomato of the season! It was a cherry tomato, so only one small bite, but still a big moment for me. The chickens ate the kohlrabi, but I still have parsley, chard, and beets for making juice and smoothies. My office mates have been sharing their cucumbers and zucchini, so I haven't done without despite the late start to my own garden. I'm jealous of your goats milk!

July 14, 2014 at 10:52 AM  
Blogger Robin Follette said...

I love this time of year. We're having stir fry with fresh veggies and chicken we raised, slaughtered and butchered for supper tonight.

This morning - raspberries, kale, lettuces, two varieties of turnip, carrots, Swiss chard, broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage. Just as some of the first planting/seeding ends, the second begins.

Sage, basil and chives. Duck and chicken eggs.

July 14, 2014 at 11:07 AM  
Blogger Jenny Erickson said...

Our family of five is foraging blackberries right now in the heat of summer. The garden is bearing green beans and kale currently. My little helpers love our little 'farm.' We love to watch farm TV too! Our chickens are very entertaining.

July 14, 2014 at 11:25 AM  
Blogger Cat H said...

Yellow squash, tomatoes, hot peppers, apples, pears, dill, oregano, and berries. The garden is kind of sad this year. Is it too late to plant potatoes??

July 14, 2014 at 11:55 AM  
Blogger Jenna said...

this is great!

July 14, 2014 at 11:56 AM  
Blogger Jenna said...

No, plant potatoes! You'll have them in Sept/October!

July 14, 2014 at 11:57 AM  
Blogger Lara said...

Spinach by the bucket full and fresh lettuce and beets, berries are coming in--Juneberries and strawberries to pick, lots of herbs to start drying this week, eggs, and a few more meat rabbits to put up. The garden is picking up steam and eager for some more peas to come in, cucumbers and summer squash soon too. Tomatoes and beans are still off a ways.

July 14, 2014 at 11:58 AM  
Blogger daisy g said...

What a beautiful array of self-sufficient yumminess.
I harvested some heat-resistant lettuce this morning (no small feat in 90 degree temps). Fresh flowers grace the foyer and kitchen.
We're not where we wanna be yet, but still workin' the dream 'til we get there.
Continued blessings, Jenna. You always inspire this suburban homesteader.

July 14, 2014 at 1:26 PM  
Blogger Molly said...

A bit off topic, but are you still teaching archery at the camp like you did last summer? Archery sounds like a lot of fun. Our local county fair has a range and I think I'm going to give it a try this year.

July 14, 2014 at 1:55 PM  
Blogger Karen said...

Drove a mile home for lunch at my city bungalow (homemade/homegrown squash soup from the weekend) and stopped by my little community garden plot on the way for tomatoes, okra, eggplant, green beans. More Sungold tomatoes (aka, candy)and herbs from my side yard bed, the last of the blackberries, more beans and tomatoes from the back yard. Barter with a neighbor for honey and the occasional eggs.

Now just need to stay awake for work this afternoon!

July 14, 2014 at 1:59 PM  
Blogger 3 Dogs Barking Farms said...

I keep having to remind myself to eat what I am growing for market I get too wrapped up in selling the great stuff and forget to eat it! Right now we have snap peas, chard, beets and salad mix but coming soon beans, zukes and cukes and tomatoes!

July 14, 2014 at 2:04 PM  
Blogger Molly said...

We have kale - lots of kale. I put it in everything; soup, spaghetti sauce, chili, burritos, lasagna, beef stroganoff. Just about anything I cook. We also mix it into our salads.

July 14, 2014 at 2:13 PM  
Blogger Nancy po said...

It's interesting your take on "no downside". I read a lot of blogs and many of them talk about the issues and problems. Most of them have families, and are older, or retired. It's hard to take a vacation, go see family, etc. Illness or injury is a big problem. Predators, emergency repairs with 0 money to fix, that stalls everything else out. Weather that wipes out your crops for canning. Luckily you're young and have a good support system from what I've read. I always meant to ask- do you own your farm, rent, lease? Sometimes that makes a difference financially...

July 14, 2014 at 3:38 PM  
Blogger Sam Sheehan said...

Nothing but a single blueberry and some kale ripe this particular morning. Got a late start on the garden this year. On the way though: cukes, zukes, tomatoes, beans, yellow squash, onions... Maybe I'll see how many of the potatoes in my cupboard are growing eyes and think about planting some..., I have a whole bed sitting empty and it's bugging me. Any reason reds and whites can't share a garden?

July 14, 2014 at 4:22 PM  
Blogger live pura vida said...

My garden has the first few ripe tomatoes, some zucchini, green beans, lettuce, hops, a couple cucumbers, basil and mint ready to eat. We are unfortunately down a head of cabbage thanks to one very chubby groundhog that is defying the laws of physics and still finding a way into the garden to help himself. City ordinances don't allow for chickens, but I can't wait until the day I have my own chickens so I can have fresh eggs available, too.

July 14, 2014 at 4:33 PM  
Blogger Jenna said...

Oh Nancy, you must be a new reader! How did you find me?

No, itt certainly isn't an easy lifestyle. But I think the challenge is part of the upside. I think not being able to travel is too.

But I don't consider issues of family, money, etc anything different than anyone else's life. Everyone deals with bills and illness and so on - but at least if you are a homesteader you get to sweat more, work harder, feel more sore in the arms and eat better! I consider all those things great!

July 14, 2014 at 4:55 PM  
Blogger Jenna said...

Molly, yes! 2 spots left! Columbus day weekend!

July 14, 2014 at 4:55 PM  
Blogger Nancy po said...

Hi Jenna, I read about your adventures in Idaho, then found you here a while back. I always meant to ask- do you own your farm, rent, lease? Just curious, as I know some share a family farm, or rent from pals. If that's invading your privacy don't answer...

July 14, 2014 at 5:01 PM  
Blogger Jeane said...

My gardening spot is very small, now. I used to have a big yard but now just a container garden on a balcony which doesn't get much direct sun. Yet I still manage to grow a few edibles. Right now I have parsley, two kinds of mint, swiss chard, oregano, one bell pepper plant, ginger and lemon balm (haven't found a good use for that, yet. Seems to smell better than it tastes). It's paltry compared to the harvest bounty I used to get, but I still smile and delight in fresh mint tea!

July 14, 2014 at 5:32 PM  
Blogger Jenna said...

Welcome Back Nancy!

So I left Idaho in Jan 2009. And moved to Sandgate Vermont, where I lived until May of 2010 when I bought this place I live and write about now. I live in Jackson, NY. And it's the traditional 30 year mortgage (26+ now?)

July 14, 2014 at 5:38 PM  
Blogger Nancy po said...

Thanks, just curious. I followed one homesteading/farm blog, and later she left it. I realized her parents owned it, so she wasn't attached to leaving to all behind...

July 14, 2014 at 5:42 PM  
OpenID T. Crockett said...

I moved at the start of summer, so I just have a few containers. But they, along with my yard have given me dill and lamb's quarters (the plant) to go on my pasta, and blackberries for dessert.

July 14, 2014 at 5:47 PM  
Blogger Tami said...

nasturtium, kale, spinach, lettuce, eggs, zukes, lemon balm, mint, blueberries, blackberries, strawberries, carrots, a green pepper is just about ready, basil, chives and golden beets. I'm anxiously awaiting for our beans, toms, peppers, cukes and other hot weather plants to ripen. Right now I'm looking at plant after plant of green tomatoes.

July 14, 2014 at 6:06 PM  
Blogger Kristie said...

Green Beans, basil,cilantro, few new potatoes, zucchini,arugula, kohlrabi, kale

July 14, 2014 at 6:32 PM  
Blogger Tammy Smith said...

Today I have: lettuce, kale, chard, waaay too many grean beans. Carrots, snow peas, the first cucumber. kohlrabi, but zucchini are lagging. So many volunteers (in nw wpa!) like potatoes and parsnips. Going out to pick black raspberries also gathered 3 eggs (hens only, duck is too young). I LOVE reading threads like this; the abundance is overwhelming.

July 14, 2014 at 6:50 PM  
Blogger Maggie in Tally said...

Jenna tell me those were not wild strawberries....? I haven't had any since I was 12, but have never forgotten the exquisite taste.

July 14, 2014 at 7:21 PM  
Blogger Karen said...

I didn't pick tonight, but I have a few snap peas that my granddaughters helped eat the other day. Basil, cilantro, tarragon, parsley and lemon verbena in the herb garden. A few tomatoes might be ripe in a week or two.

July 14, 2014 at 8:55 PM  
Blogger English sheep gal said...

Here in Western NY not much ready yet except herbs, although I had my first ripe Sungold tomato straight from the plant yesterday - delicious. Plenty in the wings almost ready to go, beets, many varieties of tomatoes, corn, beans, squash, onions, leeks, kale, chard, melons, bush beans, climbing beans, broccoli, cucumber, hot peppers, blackberries, & nasturtiums.

The thing we are most enjoying growing - our first ever chickens - who have been here for about 10 days now, what a wonderful range of noises they make, only 2-3 months old, so no eggs for a while, but they are doing very well at pest control eating up the slugs and cutworms in the veggie garden.

July 14, 2014 at 10:10 PM  
Blogger Alexandra said...

Fresh blackberries, lots (and lots) of zucchini, cherry tomatoes, kale, shallots, herbs, garlic, and a variety of woods mushrooms.

July 14, 2014 at 10:12 PM  
Blogger Sharon said...

Wow, the garden is really growing and producing the early summer crops. Sugar Snap Peas, Broccoli, Cauliflower, Strawberries, Blue Berries, Marion Berries, Squash, Spinach, Basil, Cilantro, Potatoes, baby Carrots, herbs....I have been making jam, and freezing many things.

July 14, 2014 at 11:39 PM  
Blogger Su Ba said...

Right now we have radishes, daikon, turnips, bok choy, zucchini, basil, chives, onions, snow peas and potatoes. Next week I'm hoping to add beets, green beans, tomatoes, and sweet potatoes to the harvest.

July 15, 2014 at 1:07 AM  
Blogger Sonya said...

Over the last few days: Rainbow Carrots,baby corn,eggs,potatoes, and cucumbers!

July 15, 2014 at 4:43 AM  
Blogger Weez said...

My breakfast and lunch smoothies have green and red leaf lettuce, Swiss chard, kale and raspberries from our small garden along with other organic yummies. We gave away a dozen eggs from our chickens last night and still have 2 dozen left in the fridge. Life is good!

July 15, 2014 at 8:35 AM  
Blogger Diana said...

Just harvested the garlic Sunday-it's curing now. Other than that I've got mountains of oregano, some basil and some rosemary and lots of green tomatoes!

July 15, 2014 at 9:41 AM  
Blogger Deb said...

Today I'll be picking flowers to make flower essences--Clematis, Begonias, yarrow, Motherwort. For the vase--Sweet Peas and Dahlias. For eating--lettuce, snow peas, sweet onions, green cabbage, basil, parsley, potatoes, baby yellow squash, kale, chicken, duck and goose eggs. For the stock pot--two mean roosters. For the tea pot--bee balm, lemon balm, many mints, chamomile. For the Dye pot--calendula, chamomile, red cabbage, gypsywort, dyer's broom. For the jelly making--meadow sweet. Umm, I guess I should get off of here and get busy!

July 15, 2014 at 11:49 AM  
Blogger Glyndalyn said...

Cucumber, 3 kinds of squash, white half runner beans, corn, several kinds of peppers, tomatoes, and long pie pumpkins, which are almost ripe. Apples are coming on. Picked, then ate and preserved, blue berries and black berries from the neighbor's you-pick business. Almost through with preserving the harvest, thank goodness. Also building a new small barn ourselves. Horses and maybe a mule are returning.
We grew up in rural areas and learned skills of plain living from a very young age. We also got a great education. We have moved several times and did not keep a garden or stock. That time is over. NEVER intend to live away from a rural area again.
@ Nancy: We are not that young and are not retired. We own our small farm with NO debt. We use everything grown here or share with neighbors. Also cut enough wood for 2 stoves. Why? For me, it is an independence issue: from greedy and irrational government, utility companies, and poor food.

From the Phony Farm in muggy Middle TN.

July 15, 2014 at 2:17 PM  
Blogger Dan Moore said...

Cucumbers, watermelon, cantaloupe, onions, raspberries, peaches, apples, zucchini, sweet corn,
okra, pork, and after Thursday when I pick up from the abattoir, beef!

July 15, 2014 at 8:09 PM  
Blogger Frau Glaser said...

I only have a small plot in a community garden, but it's the most wonderful feeling to grow your own food and bring home dinner from the garden! Today, I had a handful of gooseberries, as well as fried rice with my own peas and dragon tongue beans. We've been having lots (LOTS!) of kale lately, and my tomatoes are almost ready to go, too. I can't wait to live in the country and grow much more of my own food.

July 15, 2014 at 8:39 PM  
Blogger Diana said...

So far just two tomatoes and one pickling cucumber....but I have more that looks like might make it through to the harvest.

I was just stoked to get a tomato in July instead of August and it was bigger than a golf ball like last year...I live in NY state too

I planted one berry bush I bought dormant at the store....it appears it is still dormant....I will lol instead of cry because it means I have to try harder next year.

July 16, 2014 at 11:34 AM  
Blogger sandalfoot said...

That is one beautiful harvest! Ready for our daily harvest are tomatoes, eggplant, kale, swiss chard, and peppers. Herbs also. Eggs, two or three a day. Fish if somebody would fish them. But I only pick what we can eat fresh. There isn't enough in my garden for putting up, except mint for jelly and eventually cucumbers for pickles, but there is enough to avoid the grocery store, in season, as much as possible. (Sadly, no goats or cows here on out property) Refreshing to see all your readers' comments. I do see that homesteading is becoming more popular, which makes ne smile.

July 16, 2014 at 7:26 PM  

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