Friday, January 25, 2013

Share the Story

It's cold here. What makes us warmer isn't just firewood and cats in our laps, but each other. I would like to ask that anyone willing share a special sort of story. Have any of you had something bad happen to you that you turned into something positive? Tell us.

This question was inspired by this post on reddit

37 Comments:

Blogger Moose Hollow Farm said...

I think that all crappy situations benefit us since we learn from each one. I am 61 years old and I have had some really crappy moments in my lifetime (mostly when those closest to me have disappointed me and hurt me beyond belief). From those moments, I learned that the only person that I can truly trust and believe in is ME!!!!! Trust in yourself and your closest friends ~ some are more valuable than family (I've learned that the hard way, too). Take one day at a time and one situation at a time ~ don't overload yourself with worry about things that haven't even happened yet.

January 25, 2013 at 1:32 PM  
Blogger Meghan O'Dea said...

I got fired in May of 2012. It was the best thing that ever happened to me. I was working for a cruel, toxic, demoralizing company that had sapped me of my self esteem and confidence in my career. Six months later I came to and discovered I'd pulled off paying the bills and surviving on just my writing skills and some chutzpa. Taking care of myself with only my own skills and with only myself accountable was the best feeling ever, and gave me the confidence to land my dream job at a local marketing company.

January 25, 2013 at 1:50 PM  
Blogger Kathryn Jones said...

Four years ago I was diagnosed with cancer and went through chemotherapy and radiation...I learned that you have a choice...you can curl up and wait to die or you can move forward one step at a time. I am now cancer free and have also learned that by making the choice and having the strength to keep moving, I helped other people seek the strength they needed to get through their own dark times.

It also made me get off the dime and see that my story was intertwined with everyone around me and that what I do with this life, even in the darkest moments, can have a wonderful effect on others if I choose for it to.

KJ

January 25, 2013 at 2:02 PM  
Blogger daisy said...

When our son was diagnosed with autism, I felt the weight of the world on my shoulders. So many unanswered questions and miles of hills ahead to be scaled. How could anything good come of this?
It has in so many ways. Being his momma has helped me grow in ways unimaginable to me. I've realized my capacity for knowledge and compassion and patience in a way that helps me like who I am. I've become so strong, so confident in many areas. His continued progress is an inspiration every day of my life. I see the blessing that has been given to me and feel so joyful that I get to spend every day with the most amazing person in the world.
May God bless and keep you, farmer.

January 25, 2013 at 2:07 PM  
Blogger Moonwaves said...

Not a particularly inspiring story but it was when I finally got so depressed that I started seeing a therapist (after a couple of previous attempts to get help from doctors who only wanted to prescribe medication, which I didn't want, at least not before or without talk therapy). That meant that I started to pay attention to my money so that I would actually have money to pay him every week. Which meant for the first time the blinding crash of realisation of exactly how I had been not budgeting properly and how it really wasn't such a mystery after all how I had built up so much debt. It's more than eight years on but finally, in a few months, I will be debt-free. But more than that, I have learned how to control my money properly. The therapy helped enormously but the simple fact of having to pay for it (in cash!) led me to a far better place eventually.

January 25, 2013 at 2:40 PM  
Blogger Melissa said...

Eight years ago my youngest son was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at the age of 12- I did not think I could possibly cope with having to give him 4-5 shots a day. After a good cry, I realized that I wanted him to live a long, healthy life and I was the best person to help him. I discovered that I could do what I couldn't imagine doing. Four years later he was diagnosed with ulcerative colitis and was put on some heavy duty immune suppressing drugs that give him a higher risk of contracting cancer. I have learned that family is everything, and to take one day at a time and not put off things you want to do "some day". Family is messy, heart breaking and painful at times but it's all I ever want. I don't have a perfect family but it's mine and I love each and every one of them- flaws and all!

January 25, 2013 at 2:47 PM  
Blogger Karen Mehlin said...

Remember the Rolling Stones song "you can't always get what you want, but...You'll get what you need"?

Years ago, we has a stillborn, full term baby and found out it would likely only happen again. It was an incredibly mournful time. None of this was of our making but it forced us to recognize what is beyond our control..Fate, karma, call it what you like. My husband and I made our choices and lived our lives. Different from what we thought we wanted, but, good nonetheless. Then, in 1997, we were gifted with our daughter, a beautiful 19 month old from China. She is now 17, a Jr in high school and ready to set out on her own.

We truly did get "what we need" and I celebrate our lives every day!


January 25, 2013 at 2:52 PM  
Blogger Paulette said...

Oh gosh, our experience is not nearly as crushing as earlier comments, but one for which every homeowner should be prepared. On December 17, we discovered water seeping out of the wall onto the basement floor of our 1938 home. A water pipe had corroded and created a lake under the house. All I can say is thank goodness for the leak being accessible (under a closet floor), a rubber cuff, super glue, metal bands, and a hair drier. A plumber would have charged hundreds. In this process, I learned how to turn off the main water valve to the property using a key that anyone can buy, adjusting the water pressure, and living without running water for many hours. I agree Jenna, these experiences make one stronger and more self reliant, but going through it is just awful.

January 25, 2013 at 3:05 PM  
Blogger seagrrlz said...

I worked a long time for a not for profit theatre. Most of my friends worked there, I lived 5 minutes away and it appeared to be the perfect place to work. APPEARED being the imortant word in that sentence. The thing is that sometimes being part of a "community" means you end up sucked dry, treated poorly and not making verra much money. I was in it for the ART.
I got fired from that job for doing my job, strangely. Some big wig threw his weight around and threatened to cut off grants if I wasn't fired. So off I went.
I was completely freaked out bc I had no job and not a lot of money. I'd never been fired before.
Turns out to be one of the best things that ever happened. I got a new job the next day with a friend who had heard I had gotten fired.It was retail but pay was better than the theatre and no more working for free bc they couldn't afford to pay for another person to work. Full benefits(not such a big deal here in Canada as in the US but still was better). Better hours. The best part is that I met my GF of 14 years there.
So, lots of times there is a silver lining to that dark cloud :)

January 25, 2013 at 3:09 PM  
Blogger Sam Murray said...

well, it wasn't an earth shatteringly bad thing, but I'll tell you the tale of one of the funnest times I ever had at camp.
I was working at a summer camp, and I was the youngest, and lowest ranking staff member of three on our site. We had a horrendously rainy miserable week. Programming was getting cancelled left right and center. Can't swim because without fail a thunderstorm always rolled through at swim time. Can't go on the low ropes, high ropes or climbing wall, because the rain has left them slick. The camp director didn't even want us to run, for fear that the kids would slip in the mud. The other two staff members were older women and their solution was crafts, crafts, and more crafts. By Wednesday I think the kids were plotting our demise. Thursday we got a phone call: yep it's clear, get your kids in their bathing suits and down to the lake, we can have swim time today. The kids were ecstatic! but just as we were all kitted up and doing out roll call: thunder. Swim was cancelled. We were gonna have a mutiny on our hands. But we had a rubbermaid tub under the downspout for our picnic shelter, and it was brimming with cold rain water, so I announced that I was going for a swim anyways! I sat my butt down in the bucket of cold water, and all the kids laughed. then they took turns sitting in the bucket themselves while we took their pictures. Then since we were all wet and in our bathing suits anyways, we used the hill slick with wet grass and mud as a slip and slide, and had mud fights, and used the mugs from our dish kits and two strategically placed buckets of water for each team to have a water fight. It was a blast! Years later, those kids remember two things about that week at camp: the boring crafts, and the blast we had playing in the rain.

January 25, 2013 at 3:26 PM  
Blogger Sesele Paule said...

I married young and to a man who is quiet and unexpressive verbally. He was good to me, very good to me, in terms of being supportive and hard working and thrifty; without comment or criticism he paid off a large credit card debt I had accumulated because I was an idiot. But I was always complaining to him and, ashamed as I am to say it now, to friends and family. I had decided that this was probably not going to work and would have gone through with it but I got very, very ill. It turned out to be a grisly and rather disgusting colon related illness, that necessitated many medications, many doctor visits, fainting, vomiting and so on. Finally, surgery. I was sent home a few days after the surgery and the next day the wound broke open and fluids were leaking and I was in a panic. My husband got me to lie down and began cleaning me up. I said, "How can you do this disgusting task? It is so gross." he laughed and said, "I think this is what they mean by the worse part in for better or for worse. I was so worried you would die tht this is nothing, a temporary mess." It was not exactly like a lightening bolt hit me, but over the next few days I realized that there are many ways to express love and that I almost ruined a relationship because I was too immature to see that how I express love is not the only way to express it. That was 30 years ago and although he has become more verbally expressive, there are still times I wish it were more often. But I have become better at recognizing quiet steadfast love. It horrifies me to think that if I had not become deathly ill, I might have failed to recognize the best person who has ever walked into my life---so the illness was worth it.

January 25, 2013 at 3:37 PM  
Blogger Sesele Paule said...

I married young and to a man who is quiet and unexpressive verbally. He was good to me, very good to me, in terms of being supportive and hard working and thrifty; without comment or criticism he paid off a large credit card debt I had accumulated because I was an idiot. But I was always complaining to him and, ashamed as I am to say it now, to friends and family. I had decided that this was probably not going to work and would have gone through with it but I got very, very ill. It turned out to be a grisly and rather disgusting colon related illness, that necessitated many medications, many doctor visits, fainting, vomiting and so on. Finally, surgery. I was sent home a few days after the surgery and the next day the wound broke open and fluids were leaking and I was in a panic. My husband got me to lie down and began cleaning me up. I said, "How can you do this disgusting task? It is so gross." he laughed and said, "I think this is what they mean by the worse part in for better or for worse. I was so worried you would die tht this is nothing, a temporary mess." It was not exactly like a lightening bolt hit me, but over the next few days I realized that there are many ways to express love and that I almost ruined a relationship because I was too immature to see that how I express love is not the only way to express it. That was 30 years ago and although he has become more verbally expressive, there are still times I wish it were more often. But I have become better at recognizing quiet steadfast love. It horrifies me to think that if I had not become deathly ill, I might have failed to recognize the best person who has ever walked into my life---so the illness was worth it.

January 25, 2013 at 3:38 PM  
Blogger Sylvia said...

My own experiences -- my brother being killed, my son's depressive cycles, the ebb and flo of money issues, my in-laws and my parents declining health -- have all convinced me that the positives can only be seen in the rear view mirror. And at the time they are happening, looking in reverse is probably the worst thing you can do because then you start the blame game.
This time of year in North America is hard. There is no light to cheer, no green grass to smell, no fresh tomatoes to gladden your plate. Here in Atlanta, we don't even have snow to cover our ugliness of mushy weeds and drab trees.
I am proud that you cried and then set to doing something. Anything.
Sometimes, that is the best thing to do -- just set your timer and do something on your to-do list for 15 minutes.
If you were here, Jenna, I would make you a cup of tea, we would eat some nice bean soup and then get to cleaning out the chicken coop.
Blessings to you, brave one.

January 25, 2013 at 4:02 PM  
Blogger Unknown said...

This may be a terribly simplistic answer, but I'll hope it's just simple: some of the worst experiences of my life have made me a much better writer. - Michael Bird

January 25, 2013 at 4:03 PM  
Blogger Doug Pitcher said...

I can't beat cancer, death of a loved one, and the many other personal disasters that are sure to surface with this post. I hope that just knowing there are those from afar that admire what you are doing and are trying to live the same type of life as you is enough to keep you warm and happy.

January 25, 2013 at 4:16 PM  
Blogger Eileen Hileman said...

In August 2000 I was diagnosed with breast cancer. I had a female surgeon (reputed to be "the best in the West") who proceeded to inform me that: 1) my marriage would fail; 2) I'd never regain the movement I needed in my arms to continue to do my job (I am an environmental investigator); 3) I needed to "grieve my breasts." I came home ready to slit my wrists. After a really spectacular 24 hr pity party that would make the most famous soap opera envious - I got over myself. I marched back to the surgeon (w/o an appointment)and told her she better listen up: 1) my marriage was solid and it would take something more than cancer to shake that foundation - she'd do better to worry about her own. 2) I would regain full use of my arms and I had no plans to quit or change jobs; 3. I didn't need to grieve my breasts. I then told her "The train of my healing was leaving the station and she could get on board or get the hell out of my way." I hunted down a new (then) technique of breast reconstruction; hunted up a surgeon who agreed to do it (and now does them routinely) and proceeded to deal with this and get it behind me. That was thirteen years ago - I'm still married. I am now retiring from my job but having breast cancer wasn't even a blip on the radar. I have full range of motion in both arms. And I send that first surgeon a Christmas Card every year and let her know I'm still here, that none of her predictions came true and I'm having the time of my life. In retirement, we are buying a farm and starting a new adventure. Life is what you make it and not what someone tells you it will be. My wonderful oncologist told me the story of one of his patients who had received a diagnois of Stage IV pancreatic cancer. The doctor told him there was nothing to be done. The patient told the doctor not to worry that he didn't have time to be ill there was too much going on in his life. Five years passed and the surgeon was on vacation in Idaho. He ran into his former patient who was hale and hardy and surprising to the oncologist - not dead. He asked the guy what treatment he had undergone that had worked this miracle- the guy told him he never had treatment - it was like he told him before - he was too busy to die. My ocologist contrasted that with the story of a patient who was diagnosed with Stage II breast cancer but who from the beginning announced she was going to die. The doctor assured her the disease was immeniently treatable and that she would live a long life. In less than a year she was dead. Jenna you sat in that cellar and after a little pity party you got busy living again. Thats what it takes. We each make the decision to either give up and give in or get up and get going.

January 25, 2013 at 5:16 PM  
Blogger Abby said...

Melissa, my heart goes out to you. I was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at age 4. My mother said it was the hardest thing she has ever gone through. Now, in my 30s with a healthy toddler of my own, the struggles my mom and I went through (the rebellious teen years were rough!) have created an unbreakable bond between us. She is my best friend and I am hers. I don't think that ever would have occurred if we wouldn't have had to deal with this incurable disease.

January 25, 2013 at 5:40 PM  
Blogger Paradise Found Farmgirl said...

This comment has been removed by the author.

January 25, 2013 at 6:00 PM  
Blogger Paradise Found Farmgirl said...

This comment has been removed by the author.

January 25, 2013 at 6:01 PM  
Blogger Paradise Found Farmgirl said...

Diagnosed with skin cancer at 37, I went through a year of multiple mohs and plastic surgeries. Finally, Cancer free, my husband and I decided that life is too short to wait for the perfect time to buy the farm we always longed for. We sold our house and bought a house with property in a farming community. We built 6 acres of fencing and a barn. We now have a driving pony, working draft horse, laying hens, and enjoy breeding show rabbits and silkies. We also garden and grow all of our own hay. Future plans include goats and a few sheep. Maybe a pig! We love the farming life and have never looked back!
Heather in PA

January 25, 2013 at 6:04 PM  
Blogger Cathy said...

I got fired from my first job ever, found another job and then got fired from it (they called it "letting you go"). End of the world at the time - best thing that ever happened to me in the long run. I found a job as a nanny with a wonderful family. I was with them for 12 years and we are still friends 15 years later. They paid for my college education and I now work at the college I graduated from. I firmly believe that everything happens for a reason. May not see it at the time or ever but good will come out of it.

January 25, 2013 at 6:18 PM  
Blogger greendria said...

Silly, but negative turned positive: this past summer a lifelong dream finally came true when my own hen hatched five eggs that had been fertilized by my own rooster. I loved watching the mother hen and her brood live in my backyard through the late summer and fall months. Then, a few weeks ago, I was awakened at 4 a.m. by FOUR roosters crowing. As it turns out, three of the five hatchlings were males, and that morning they all started crowing, and their father was competing with them. It was so noisy, I thought our neighbors would kill me. Throughout that day, they all began trying to mount the hens. One rooster would start to mount a hen, then the others would run over and try to mount at the same time, the poor hen squawking and squirming and getting feathers ripped out. So I got all four roosters separated from the flock, strangely they didn't try to hurt each other. After thinking through the options, I decided it was finally time to butcher my own poultry, to use these four roosters for food. I dreaded it, since the one other time I had tried it it had gone so badly. However, this time, with my husband's help, we killed and butchered all four roosters and put them in the freezer. Wednesday I cooked the first one, made chicken and dumplings with him. It was so satisfying to eat meat that I grew, I can't describe it.

January 25, 2013 at 6:44 PM  
Blogger blind irish pirate said...

I was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis at the young age of 22 afters dealing with several years of pain. It's been a painful lessons in five years, but I guess I've learned a hell of a lot about myself. First, that I shouldn't ignore my red flags, because I know my body and its tendencies. Second, how f*n bad ass I am, because, sheesh, look at this and what I do. Third, how very great my community, especially my husband, is when it comes to support, letting it be encouragement. Sickness and health? Absolutely.

January 25, 2013 at 9:26 PM  
Blogger kandy Gray said...

3 years ago my husband called me to tell me the bad news that, after all the testing that we had both gone through, the infertility was on his side. that meant that no amount of fertility treatments would give us a baby. i said ok, that we would talk when he got home. i hung up, fell to the floor and cried my heart out for the loss of the baby that would never be. then i got up off the floor and dried my eyes and blew my nose.

when he got home, he said that he would understand if i wanted a divorce. i told him not to be stupid; that we would travel and see the world instead. that we would have just as great a life as if we had a kid. better even.

my husband is sri lanken. the option of adoption or donor dad is just not an option in his culture. his family would freak if we even mentioned it. i had brought it up at the beginning of the fertility tests, and he had flatly refused. no way.

2 weeks after getting the bad news, he called me into the living room to look at something on the computer. he had found the perfect sperm donor. did i like the guy too?

jake it 2 years old now and he is loved beyond belief by the entire family .

January 25, 2013 at 9:34 PM  
Blogger Kati said...

I lost my job in November 2011. I was an assistant teacher at a Montessori school, and it was really an abusive work environment. You'd think I was in high school what with how much I was bullied and teased because I wear hearing aids. When I got fired, I had a lot of time on my hands, so I did a lot of thinking and reading. My husband asked me straight out what I wanted to do. To say I love to knit is a huge understatement! I started knitting things to sell on Etsy. Eventually I did get my old childcare job at church back, but knitting is where my heartbeat is. I will be quitting in May, so I can have more time for knitting, ministry, homesteading and otherwise living a meaningful life! I don't think I would have gotten to this point had I not lost my job the way I did.

January 25, 2013 at 9:35 PM  
Blogger lemontreelane said...

I believe that it all works out in the end, and if it doesn't, then it's not the end.

January 25, 2013 at 11:34 PM  
Blogger Linda said...

After 26 years of marriage, my husband divorced me after deciding he was gay. I thought my life was over, that I was too old to ever be happy again. Luckily, I could work as a nurse so supported myself as I went through 7 years of hell, really, so depressed, moving all over the country looking for a place I loved. Finally, through a blind date, I met a very nice Frenchman whom I married 3 years later. I am writing this from our home in France, happy and fulfilled. You can't plan these things. None of my present life would have happened if hadn't divorced. Life can be amazing.

January 26, 2013 at 2:27 AM  
Blogger just look said...

Last summer within one month, my beloved 14 year old Black Lab died, I was fired from a job I dearly loved, followed by having my daughter text me a copy of the Ultrasound of a 12-week old first baby growing inside her. I'm still trying to find a job, but very much aware of the odds that I'll be able to find one to fit my needs and use my skills. (Most folks my age are already retired.) I'm managing on extended unemployment. Being unemployed left the door open for my son to ask to pay me to care for my two grandsons while my daughter-in-law returns to a part time job. Yesterday as my grandsons and I were driving through town, the older one blurted out how much he loves having me to care for them three days a week. Sorely needed balm on a wound.
A friend has reminded me of the observation that the good times don't last, but neither do the bad times. Seems inescapable that we need some of each. Carrot seeds can't sprout without firmly packed soil to push against, Beethoven may not have been able to composed his 9th symphony, (or Moonlight Sonata), without having endured the loss of hearing, or a broken heart. It's been my experience that since we come equipped with a full set of feelings, love and and anger, grief and joy, the trick is to try and balance them all with as much grace as possible. As easy as it might be to wish to experience only the sunshine days, once the storm has passed, I try to appreciate how the wind and rain enrich my world as well. A person's main job is to be able to find the strength to hang in and be thankful for the whole package. As Margaret Mead once said, living isn't for the faint of heart.

January 26, 2013 at 7:38 AM  
Blogger J.D. Collins said...

Well, in the past ten years my husband passed, after 28 years the job went in the economic bust, lost my home, my father passed, and now I care for my mother. The moral to the story:

Bad things are going to happen.

In the past ten years I've won a national award, cared for those stricken by a local flood, cared for my father til the end, gotten a dog, and am turning this bit of land into an urban farm.

Good things happen to those who realize this life winds and turns. It's not all linear.

January 26, 2013 at 9:22 AM  
Blogger Hughes ap Williams said...

In 1999 I was fired from a job at an international corporation. For a few days I cried, thinking about what a horrible employee I must have been to be fired...until I realized it wasn't me.

Thinking about what I really enjoyed and having trained and shown my own obedience dogs, I got a job as a kennel assistant at a private boarding kennel.

Within a year the local daily newspaper (owned by the largest US publisher) accepted an animal-related article I wrote..for no pay. Then they used another one...no pay again. Then I proposed another article; the editor called and said that she couldn't pay me, but would cover my expenses.

After that third article the newspaper offered me a job as an animal writer. Then I expanded by proposing articles on local quilt shows. Then feature articles on local politics. The paper made me a correspondent (a freelance regular).

By 2010 I had left the kennel, keeping a few private pet-sitting clients, and was working as a writer.

The icing on the cake was my mother's happy reaction: "You are finally using your English degree!" The one my parents worked so hard to pay for.

January 26, 2013 at 9:37 AM  
Blogger Amy McPherson Sirk said...

Seven years ago I found myself alone with two kids to support and over 30,000 of marital debt. My husband had developed a mental illness that made him dangerous (he was definitely not himself). I took what little I had and moved myself and the youngest child to the Midwest where we could live on practically nothing. I bought a shabby little house in a shabby little town but it gave me time to process the long-running emergency we'd been living in as John's condition deteriorated. Poverty, fear, hopelessness, we went through all of it. My youngest is now a junior in high school and I'm two semesters away from finishing my degree in Plant and Soil Science. I started an "urban" farm from my back yard. This will be my 5th year of supplying a Farm Share program with organic fruits and vegetables for 20 weeks of each year. We're not out of the woods yet but the situation is no longer desperate. I even joined an online dating service. No, haven't gone on a date yet but who knows?

January 26, 2013 at 9:57 AM  
Blogger Holly said...

Jenna-
Crying is good, picking yourself up afterward is even better. When my oldest son was little he was very ill with asthma. Many late nights were spent in the E.R. I recall vivdly crying on the way to the hospital, and pep talking myself into bravery in the parking lot so I could advocate for him with the Doctors. Being a single mom with an ill child was the hardest thing to deal with But I learned I was stronger than I thought. And when he was back in good health I gave thanks and rejoiced in him. I now feel that I can get through all things...including when my dad passed away unexpectedly. I may need some tears and time...but I eventually come out "fighting"

January 26, 2013 at 12:35 PM  
Blogger Tiffrz-N-Kidz said...

In 2005 I discovered that my husband of 6 years, father of my 2 children, was cheating on me with a little bimbo 10 years my junior. After so many years of his lying, drinking, verbal and emotional abuse I decided that I had finally had enough. Have you heard the song, "Independence Day" by Martina McBride? While I did not take things to that extreme, the decision to get out of that marriage was the best decision I ever made.

It was painful leaving my friends, a beautiful house that I loved, and a good job, to move back to Texas where my family lived, (which caused me different but serious emotional pain I am sure you can understand). It was hard on the children who could not understand "why?".

But now I have grown into the person I had hoped I would be when I was young. It was scary, but totally worth it.

January 26, 2013 at 2:21 PM  
Blogger Ellen Rathbone said...

Like so many here, I lost my job with NYS in 2010. Unlike many, though, I had a year's notice that the axe was going to fall. I spent that year driving to Maine, Maryland, Michigan, and various parts of NY, interviewing for various jobs. I had phone interviews in TX and MN. I applied for still other jobs in WA, MT, and IL. Things were getting down to the wire. Sure, thanks to my folks, my house was paid off, but I was in my mid-40s and was living (and working) where I had always wanted to be: the Adirondacks. Unlike some of my coworkers, who were also slated for unemployment, I found a job just before the axe fell. My house sold before I had a chance to put it on the market. And now, two years + later, I am still at my "new" job in MI - not a place I had ever planned to live in, but as luck would have it I have met many wonderful people, have a very busy job, and am discovering a whole new ecosystem. What could've turned into a disaster has turned out okay. And who knows...maybe THIS year I will finally get chickens!

January 26, 2013 at 4:48 PM  
Blogger Kaitlin Torp said...

It isn't so much that I turned the bad parts into good parts, but that the bad parts weren't quite so bad and were actually making the good parts possible.
I have a masters in library science, and while I was in grad school there was a lot of weight placed upon getting a job in a library so that you have experience when you go out in the real world. Well, getting a job in a library in a county with three different universities that offer LS degrees is pretty impossible. Eventually, a friend recommended me to her boss and I got an interview at a university library. I thought it went well. They did not. I wasn't hired and I could feel that familiar panic of possibly failing at life starting to rise up.
A week later another friend gave me her boss' contact information in the youth services office at a local public library. I interviewed and got the job. And you know what? I got to work with my friend, my boss became my friend, and I loved loved loved my job. I probably would have been stressed and lonely at the university library. But if I had gotten the job there, I would never have considered the public library.
Thank you universe! I haven't questioned the things that have happened to me since.

January 27, 2013 at 11:32 AM  
Blogger 2 Punk Dogs said...

Years ago I injured my back and couldn't ride or take care of my horse without pain. It was a hard choice, but I decided to sell the horse, and luckily a friend helped find the perfect new home. I was exhausted, broke and in constant pain, so it was a relief to have more time to heal and sleep.
At the time I was in a bad relationship with a very controlling and negative person, which I had been able to block out since I was never home, always either at work or the barn. One day I was talking to my mom and she said "you shouldn't have to live like that, you can come home." It was like a weight had been lifted! She came and helped me move home with what would fit into her car and mine that day.
At the time it seemed like the end of the world when I had to sell my horse, but it actually allowed me the time and freedom to change pretty much everything about my life. I was able to find a better job, play in bands, meet my husband, go back to school, get an even better job, pay for a small wedding and honeymoon in cash, buy and renovate a small older house and adopt a bunch of animals.
So glad you're living your life the way you want, even though it can be hard at times.

January 28, 2013 at 9:18 PM  
Blogger OurCrazyFarm said...

Thanks for the opportunity to share! As a fellow farm gal, I have enjoyed reading your farming adventures. Following is our story:

On Friday February 18, 2011, God did the unthinkable in our life: He chose to take our 12-year-old son, Trent, home to heaven in a skiing accident.It is only considered “the unthinkable” because our plans are not God’s plans, and our ways are not God’s ways.

Before Trent was born we had entrusted the Lord with his life and had asked Him, above all else, to bring salvation to our son. Our greatest desire was that he would be used in a mighty way for God’s glory, and that God would let him dwell in heaven for eternity.


God answered our prayers that Friday in a mightier way than we could have imagined, and we have been rejoicing in His good works and His mercies ever since.

Trent was a boy who truly lived. From the very beginning he did what he loved and enjoyed to the full the gifts and skills that God had given him. In his short life he saw much of this world, traveling as far as India, the Bahamas, Bass Pro Shop in Missouri where he explored his favorite destination on his golden birthday, as well as many family camping trips. God instilled a love of hunting and fishing in Trent, and a joy of the great outdoors. He tried everything that interested him, even carving his own long bow and succeeding in taxidermy. In his short years he lived life to the fullest.

But as we are all destined to, Trent also died. On Friday, February 18, 2011, we said goodbye to our son as he left for a skiing trip with his friends, not knowing that he would never be coming back home. God says that He knows the number of our days, that He has created each one, and that He will do what He pleases (Psalm 115:3; Job14:5).

God’s standards to enter His kingdom are high: He expects perfection. Trent was not perfect, not even close. God graciously provided His perfect Son, Jesus Christ, as the atonement for our sinfulness and requires that we simply believe and acknowledge Him for it. God does the rest.

For most of his life Trent struggled with his own sinfulness before God. He knew that he was not right before God, and nothing he could do would ever make up for the sins he had committed to make him worthy to enter heaven. In the spring of 2010, God graciously chose to bring salvation to Trent through repentance and the saving grace of Christ Jesus. Trent’s life was transformed and we enjoyed the young fruit in his life as we watched God work.

It was with great peace and much rejoicing, then, that we as his family have sent him off before us and accepted God’s perfect plan for Trent’s life. Our longing is that God would be glorified in what He has done to wake up many to the realization that we are not guaranteed any number of years in this world (Psalm 39:4-5).

On Friday morning we had our son; on Friday afternoon he was gone.

What we have asked so many people since the accident is: “What if it had been you? Where would you be right now?”

Scripture says that the gospel will go forth with much sorrow and heartache. Please let Trent’s short life be a wake-up call to you. We are rejoicing in the sorrow because we know where our son is and that we will one day be with him again for eternity because of our own salvation.

God's mercies are new every day and His peace does surpass all understanding (Lamentations 3:22-23; Philippians 4:6-7). It is with great rejoicing that we release our son, Trent, age 12, to our Heavenly Father. Dance before your King, my son.

January 29, 2013 at 12:33 AM  

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