Thursday, April 19, 2012

the war on raccoons

Last night raccoons attacked, half of my laying hen flock was killed and Ryan the gosling is limping badly. I found their bodies all over the yard, just their heads eaten and a few bites of breast meat. A few young meat birds were taken too. I know it was coons because when I heard the screams I ran out at 2AM with a rifle and saw one as big as a bobcat scatter off. I didn't realize the damage then, because I only saw the one dead bird.

It's on.

85 Comments:

Blogger becky3086 said...

Been there! Set some live traps. You'll never get the sneaky thing with a gun.

April 19, 2012 at 6:49 AM  
Anonymous Kate said...

Our dogs sleep in the barn with the chickens, and that keeps the racoons out (although once a mink got in and killed 5 chickens, so it's not a perfect system - but then, no system I have ever contrived on this farm has been perfect).

April 19, 2012 at 6:52 AM  
Blogger Kate said...

Our dogs sleep in the barn with the chickens and that's kept the racoons out (although once a mink got in and killed 5 chickens, so the system isn't perfect - but then, no system I've ever contrived for this farm has been perfect).

April 19, 2012 at 6:56 AM  
Blogger JulieG said...

I had trouble with dogs killing my chickens in Oklahoma. Bought stiff fence wire and put it in the ground around the chicken shed. That didn't help though when I was gone to town in the day and the chickens were out.

Good luck getting them!

April 19, 2012 at 7:06 AM  
Blogger Karen Rickers said...

Oy! Raccoons are sneaky beasts, I don't know why the general population thinks of them as cute. When I lived in Toronto, the raccoons fed on garbage all winter, not hibernating. They were huge and ornery and a danger even to my fairly large greyhounds (who have quite thin, fragile skin).

So sorry about your flock.

April 19, 2012 at 7:07 AM  
Blogger Meredith A said...

Sorry, that sucks. Time to review your predator proofing strategy, shore up the barn, and out fox a coon.

April 19, 2012 at 7:07 AM  
Blogger seagrrlz said...

I HATE Racoons!!!! One of the things I always liked about living in Newfoundland is that we did not have Racoons. Apparently now we have them. It appears they hitched a ride here somehow.Not looking forward to them making it to this side of the Island. Good Luck getting them. Maybe it's time for the Coon Hat to make a reappearance in the Fashion World.

April 19, 2012 at 7:13 AM  
Blogger Sharon said...

It adds insult to injury that they don't take one or two birds and eat the whole thing. They just take a few bites out of a bunch of birds. Aggravating!

April 19, 2012 at 7:25 AM  
Blogger Casie Duberstein said...

That's exactly why our chickens have a nice big run all fenced in and are locked securely in the coop every night. Haven't lost one yet!

April 19, 2012 at 7:40 AM  
Blogger Odie Langley said...

Get em girl, any way you can.

April 19, 2012 at 7:43 AM  
Blogger J.D. said...

This news is so not good!

April 19, 2012 at 7:56 AM  
Blogger Tina - Our Rustic Roots said...

That bites! Go get 'em!

April 19, 2012 at 7:57 AM  
Blogger Rachael said...

Funny story for a not-so-funny situation: we had a predator of some sort snatching hens in the night so we set out a live trap. For days it was empty until one morning I found on of the hens tucked inside. Either she sought refuge in the trap or she was a savage cannibal...
Anyway, best of luck! Farm life always lends for good stories.
~Rachael from The Rehomesteaders

April 19, 2012 at 8:08 AM  
Blogger phaedra96 said...

I HATE coons and possums. They are nasty, destructive and I really see no use in them...bout on the same level as ticks, skeeters, flies and grackles. Ugh. Guess you need to rethink your predator proofing.

April 19, 2012 at 8:12 AM  
Blogger sheila said...

Great Pyrenees and/or electric fencing are the only things I've found effective.

April 19, 2012 at 8:12 AM  
Blogger daisy said...

I'm so sorry, Jenna. Do whatcha gotta do.

April 19, 2012 at 8:29 AM  
Blogger singinggardengirl said...

Oh no! Get 'im, Jenna!

April 19, 2012 at 8:32 AM  
Blogger rabbit said...

Raccoons aren't hibernators.

April 19, 2012 at 8:33 AM  
Blogger rabbit said...

Raccoons aren't hibernators.

April 19, 2012 at 8:35 AM  
Blogger Mindy Smith said...

I have a new English Shepherd puppy I got specifically for this situation. We haven't had raccoon problems (yet) but we have had foxes stealing hens in broad daylight (seriously, I walked outside at 2PM to see a fox secreting away a hen) and real hawk issues that belong on when animals attack. The shepherd will work as many livestock guardians do, eventually, and that should mean some respite for my decimated flock.

Good luck with your critters.

April 19, 2012 at 8:37 AM  
Blogger Brenda said...

I was going to suggest a Great Pyrenees dog, as well. Their job is to protect their domain, and they stay up all night making sure the "wolves" stay away. We've always had a G.P. and even though I lost one chicken this spring, I'm quite sure it was from a hawk. The dog would be very protective of the sheep and lambs, too.

April 19, 2012 at 8:39 AM  
Blogger Jenna said...

Wow, what a horrible thing to wake up too... And what mean, wasteful little jerks.

Hope you figure out a way to keep the rest of your flocks safe!

April 19, 2012 at 8:58 AM  
Blogger Fiona@RowangarthFarm said...

I'm sorry for your loss. Decapitated poultry is no way to start one's day. We lost baby ducks to raccoons (one particularly nasty beast ripped the sides off a small A-frame shelter to grab the ducklings) but we were able to live trap it. Our bigger problem is with foxes. I saw one just this morning prowling around the backyard. Bold bugger...

April 19, 2012 at 8:59 AM  
Blogger Michelle said...

I hate those buggers. I use a hav-a-hart trap then shoot 'em in the trap. Ugh. And I discovered that they could climb STRAIGHT UP the wall of my barn and get in through the eaves... had to block off the eaves, which had been left open for ventilation. Oh well! Good luck in your eradication mission.

April 19, 2012 at 9:01 AM  
Blogger Leslie Lyne Zantow said...

I had coon and skunk problems for years until I changed tactics. I put a radio in the hen house tuned to public talk radio and kept it on 24/7. I also kept lights on and put chicken wire over all the windows. This kept my folk safe from all predators. In the past raccoons actually broke through my glass windows to get in and kill a hen and her clutch. It becomes an animal war unfortunately. But the radio does work amazingly well. The hens seemd to enjoy Simply Folk and Mystery Hour, I think the music was soothing for them and what chicken doesn't enjoy a good mystery?

April 19, 2012 at 9:01 AM  
Blogger Leslie Lyne Zantow said...

I had coon and skunk problems for years until I changed tactics. I put a radio in the hen house tuned to public talk radio and kept it on 24/7. I also kept lights on and put chicken wire over all the windows. This kept my folk safe from all predators. In the past raccoons actually broke through my glass windows to get in and kill a hen and her clutch. It becomes an animal war unfortunately. But the radio does work amazingly well. The hens seemd to enjoy Simply Folk and Mystery Hour, I think the music was soothing for them and what chicken doesn't enjoy a good mystery?

April 19, 2012 at 9:02 AM  
Blogger Michelle said...

I hate those buggers. I discovered that they could climb STRAIGHT UP the wall of my new barn and get in through the eaves, so I had to block off the eaves, which I'd left open for ventilation. I used a hav-a-hart trap, then shot the stinkers in the trap. Ugh. Good luck getting rid of them!

April 19, 2012 at 9:02 AM  
Blogger Pit Stop Farm said...

How secure is your barn at night? For us, our chickens are in a shed at night - all doors are locked and the windows have 1/2" hardware cloth over them. Our hens are most exposed during the day when the free range in a large fenced in pen (no roofing).

April 19, 2012 at 9:05 AM  
Blogger Michelle said...

Raccoons are so cute, why do they have to be such assholes.

Coon skin cap?

April 19, 2012 at 9:13 AM  
Blogger seagoddess said...

Oh g-d those racoons as a friend used to say are "as bold as brass!" Good luck and I'm sorry for your loss!

April 19, 2012 at 9:15 AM  
Blogger Rebecca said...

Have you tried electric fencing? That's what works for Jessie Knadler on her chicken farm in rural Virginia. She farm blogs over at www.rurallyscrewed.com

April 19, 2012 at 9:20 AM  
Blogger ladyfarrier said...

Also BTDT. Like the other poster, it takes a really beefed up predator proof hen house securely locked up at dusk to protect them.

And I live trap a lot, living next to a Forest Preserve.

I'm so sorry about your hens, Jenna.

April 19, 2012 at 9:23 AM  
Blogger Tara said...

Ugh. They are the devil's minions, I'm convinced! Electric fencing around the birds' shelter works very well to deter them, we've found. Doesn't take much either - a single strand of tape low to the ground seems to do the job around here. I'll have to ask my husband how low - it seems to be at just the right level where they can't go over OR under it.

April 19, 2012 at 9:40 AM  
Anonymous nytesong said...

Ugh! How awful! I'm sorry for your losses and I hope you find a solution ASAP!

April 19, 2012 at 9:42 AM  
Blogger damnyankee said...

So sorry Jenna. Bastards. Love your picture with the new lamb though.

April 19, 2012 at 9:52 AM  
Blogger Christine said...

Oh, that sucks! Have you ever thought of getting an alpaca? I hear they make great "guard dogs". I can't imagine how precarious and stressful life must have been back when there were no grocery stores as back up plans; when you truly were out of food if your pig meat was infected, or your chickens were killed. You'd be running to your neighbours instead of the local grocery chain.

April 19, 2012 at 10:02 AM  
Blogger Christine said...

I saw a documentary about raccoons in Japan awhile ago; there used to be a japanese cartoon show featuring a raccoon family, and it started a crazy where everyone was importing them as pets, and they became ferral and now they're destroying a lot of the ancient architecture and buildings. Tenacious little buggers.

April 19, 2012 at 10:04 AM  
Blogger Karen said...

I HATE raccoons. I actually had them living in my porch ceiling last year - I live in Philadelphia - and after I chased them out of there, they started visiting the back yard and scaring the chickens. Their coop is securely locked and even has hardware cloth stapled across the bottom so othing can dig in, but I'd come out in the a.m. to feed them and find little sneaky paw prints all over.

Good luck with getting rid of them. I have a Hav-a-Hart trap and if I catch one this year (I don't have the means to shoot it and it wouldn't be good in a city neighborhood) it might just go in my backup rain barrel. No mercy on these guys.

April 19, 2012 at 10:06 AM  
Blogger Kelly said...

The coons around here seem to like chicken bait thats been out for three days, nasty! Or try cat food! Good luck hope you catch it and sorry for your losses :(

April 19, 2012 at 10:06 AM  
Blogger Jenny said...

Jenna, your blood must have been pumping! You were able to fall back asleep? It requires the same tenacity and courage, I imagine to run out there with your rifle as it does to get back on big Merlin. Be strong and courageous!

April 19, 2012 at 10:10 AM  
Anonymous Lilly said...

Same thing happened to us when a raccoon dug under our chicken tractor. They only needed about a 4 inch deep depression to squeeze through. We set out live traps baited with marshmallows of all things and caught 14 raccoons over the course of the next 3 weeks. Once they know where the easy meal is they'll keep coming back. I'd patch up the coop as best you can.

April 19, 2012 at 10:27 AM  
Blogger Jimmie said...

I honestly don't see any way to protect your chickens/ducks other than to lock them up at night especially, in a wire run, complete with wire overhead and also buried about 10" deep underground. I know your animals are important to you, and you need to just bite the bullet and protect them. This is not the first time you've lost chickens/ducks. Please wise up and protect them, even if you have to borrow the money to do it. Not caging them up at night is like an open invitation to any predator that stalks at night. Your gun won't get them all; they'll keep coming back. Cruel way for them to die.

Diane in North Carolina

April 19, 2012 at 10:27 AM  
Blogger Becky said...

That is so sad. A couple weeks ago, my neigbor's pitbull came a half mile up our road and killed one of my hens in broad daylight. Do whatever you have to do, Jenna.. because now they know where to get dinner. :( Also, I don't know if you've thought about a guard llama for your sheep. They'll guard against anything that comes into their space.. I have a big guard llama, but the pitbull-chicken tragedy happened outside Carlos's area and he wasn't able to get to her. I think given half the chance, he'd stomp anything that tried to get his herd/flock.

April 19, 2012 at 10:28 AM  
Blogger katiegirl said...

Same set up as Pit Stop, for us. They're locked in the coop at night. The eaves have wire, and the windows have rat wire. Only time I've lost anything is when I forgot to lock the in one night.

April 19, 2012 at 10:29 AM  
Blogger Kris said...

Jenna, I am so sorry. I have a friend who has racoons kill hers too. Being way out here in the middle of no where, I would think they would kill mine too. But that has never happened. Yet. That is so horrible. And the others will be traumatized for awhile. So be prepared for that.

But along with death, comes new life. I am so glad your ewes are having lambs. I am so in love with my lambs. I have to have some lamb love every day. Then I get itchy runny watery hideous eyes the rest of the day. But it's worth it. I love my sheep.

April 19, 2012 at 10:34 AM  
Blogger CJ said...

Lost my whole 5 week old flock two years ago. I did the same thing as Leslie, I put a radio in the barn on a station that is on the air 24/7 and have a light on.

In the summer and most the winter my coop is wide open around the clock - the birds can come and go as they please.

Knock on my dense head, but I haven't lost a bird since the radio went on.

April 19, 2012 at 10:35 AM  
Blogger Catcoco said...

I am very sorry to read this. We were in a similar situation a year ago when a young raccoon fit himself through the 2" eaves of the coop that had been safely housing birds for 4 years. He got 30 birds (16 ducklings and 14 pullets). I was SO mad ! We stayed up a few nights, taking turns guarding the coops because we wanted to catch him. We set a humane trap up after that because we needed the sleep... but he never came back. He just beheaded and dismembered all the young birds that I had imported as hatching eggs from 4 provinces away, and went on his way. He probably realized that a farmette full of raccoon haters (along with a Golden Pyrenees) was not the best place for him to get his nightly fun... Good luck catching yours ! (I now officially hate raccoon. I remember I used to have puzzles of them as a child and used to find them so cute. I didn't know they were serial killers. They don't even kill to eat, it seems that they just enjoy torturing other animals).

April 19, 2012 at 10:38 AM  
Blogger CJ said...

Lost my whole 5 week old flock two years ago. I did the same thing as Leslie, I put a radio in the barn on a station that is on the air 24/7 and have a light on.

In the summer and most the winter my coop is wide open around the clock - the birds can come and go as they please.

Knock on my dense head, but I haven't lost a bird since the radio went on.

April 19, 2012 at 10:39 AM  
Blogger Catcoco said...

Since last year, the 2" eaves have all been covered with wire, on all our three coops. And the three goats are in the same building as the breeding chickens. I have read that they are good guardians against raccoon... not that I think there is any way one could get in. My neighbor lost her rooster to a hawk last week, in the middle of the afternoon. As I once read on Suzanne McMinn's blog : " If you are going to have livestock, you're going to have dead stock"...

April 19, 2012 at 10:46 AM  
Blogger Amy said...

What a grisly scene to wake up to...ack. Like Michelle above said, they are so cute- too bad they can be such jerks. I feel for you- I'm sure you feel quite violated (well your farm was violated). But you ARE your farm... it just stinks!

Hope you find a good solution to remove this latest threat- they can sure be tricky, that I DO know!

April 19, 2012 at 11:06 AM  
Blogger Amy said...

What a grisly scene to wake up to...ack. Like Michelle above said, they are so cute- too bad they can be such jerks. I feel for you- I'm sure you feel quite violated (well your farm was violated). But you ARE your farm... it just stinks!

Hope you find a good solution to remove this latest threat- they can sure be tricky, that I DO know!

April 19, 2012 at 11:06 AM  
OpenID domesteading said...

Someone already suggested the radio method and I second that. It even worked for my friend in San Francisco who had gangsta city racoons coming in her cat door at night. Also, I lock my hens in at night and let them out during the day. I had a chicken massacre, I think from a bobcat I saw strolling around my place. It managed to get inside the henhouse and take away three hens, leaving a trail of blood and feathers and nothing else. So sad. The henhouse is all buttoned up now though!

April 19, 2012 at 11:23 AM  
Blogger Paulette said...

Game and Fish in Albuquerque was so overwhelmed with the raccoon trappings, that they were doing little else. They finally contracted to Critter Care. We trapped twenty raccoons last summer - some beautiful, some really mangy, all vicious, bold, and hungry. In our case, they were eating all of our fruits and vegetables. They could not release these animals too far away for my liking.

I am so sorry for your losses, Jenna. It is really heartbreaking to experience the carnage they create.

April 19, 2012 at 11:31 AM  
Blogger Kelsie said...

I know you probably don't want another dog, but Great Pyrenees really are fantastic "flock guardians." They're made to withstand all sorts of weather, and will guard anything you put in front of them. We had them on the goat farm where I worked, and they slept with the flock at night. They also guarded the sheep and the cattle. We DID have a problem with one of them...she kept killing baby chicks. The owner of the farm told me she had been sent from another farm for that reason, so she was probably an anomaly. I'd imagine if you raised one right, that wouldn't be an issue. They're kind of aloof towards humans. Definitely working dogs, through and through.

April 19, 2012 at 11:31 AM  
Blogger Jenna said...

absolutely no livestock guardian dogs on my farm. none. too close to the main road where people with many dogs and small children, cars, and other critters walk by I would not walk the dog barking at. I also do not want an outside dog. I have no qualms with them, but they are not for me. 3 dogs is enough!

and I am okay with the loss. I choose to have a free range flock. I do not want my chickens in a run. I would rather lose half like this than havet them in a pen, as they are not my source of income, but my source of eggs.

yes, the coop is shut at night. Raccons found a way in. I will trap and kill them.

April 19, 2012 at 11:36 AM  
Blogger kwdiving said...

I am so sorry. Coons are everywhere, we even have them here in the fla keys. They get huge from stealing everybody's pet food. Plus we have tons of feral chickens, which I am sure they love. Hang in there. Best wishes

April 19, 2012 at 11:38 AM  
Blogger Misty said...

Whenever things like this happen here, I feel as if someone has sucker punched me in the gut. I always feel bad, wondering what I could have done better. There's usually always a little something that I can improve upon (ie rabbit screening the windows kept the coon out that kept climbing through...don't ask me how he scaled the wall to do it, though). I don't pen my birds either, they roam the yard, the adjacent fields, the road, and sometimes the neighbor's yard. Oh, and by the way, cat food is a great incentive for live trapping raccoons.

April 19, 2012 at 11:55 AM  
Blogger Trish Short Lewis said...

So sorry to read that. Been there, too. Area feral dogs slaughtered flocks of ours last year, had to start all over. We now have a wonderful LGD named Gandalf, bless him. Good luck!

April 19, 2012 at 11:55 AM  
Blogger Jenny said...

Oh no Jenna! I'm so sorry to hear there were so many casualties. So sad.

April 19, 2012 at 12:03 PM  
Blogger Meredith A said...

the time and energy trapping and killing predators could be spent repairing areas in the barn where you are essentially opening up a predator buffet. this won't be the last coon, you could trap them or prevent them from creating a feeding frenzy after dark on your farm.

with $100 a bird chickens at your farm, i can't imagine not protecting them further. once this coon is gone another coon, fox, etc. will take its place. why not just fix the barn.

April 19, 2012 at 12:07 PM  
Blogger Victoria Nidetch said...

Those racoons are toast!

April 19, 2012 at 12:40 PM  
Blogger Victoria Nidetch said...

Those racoons are toast!

April 19, 2012 at 12:41 PM  
Blogger goatgirl said...

Even though they were locked up at night, a raccoon pulled my ducks through the wire. They are nasty beasts. My neighbor killed them...no more problems.

April 19, 2012 at 1:12 PM  
Blogger Sue Steeves said...

I think you would look quite fetching in a coon skin cap!

April 19, 2012 at 1:20 PM  
Blogger Erika said...

But the chickens are a source of income to you. You use them to barter, etc. As I've been reading this blog long enough, you would also like to give up the Mon-Thurs job eventually.

So go get your traps, but like others have suggested, you need to do a bit more on battening down the catches to keep the invaders out. They are very smart.

Good Luck!

April 19, 2012 at 1:37 PM  
Blogger Erika said...

For starters, I have been enjoying reading this blog. You've come a long way Jenna, keep up the good work!

I would have to argue that the chickens are indeed a source of income to you. They provide the food on your table and you use them to barter with. Thus you have suffered a financial loss. Plus, you have the desire to be able to give up your Mon - Thurs job. You can't afford to loose chickens to a greedy raccoon!

So batten down the hatches more on the chicken coop - those raccoons are smart buggers!

April 19, 2012 at 1:43 PM  
Blogger Trekout2 said...

Years back I had the samething happen to us in the middle of the night .I grab flashlight ran out to the chicken coop turn On the flashlight and two feet in front of me in a tree looking face to face was a Raccon we both ran in the opposet direction screaming .... But he was back the back the next night....You'll need to use some of that Jenna true grit and determination to get them ... Good luck

April 19, 2012 at 1:51 PM  
Blogger pjo2179 said...

Guinea hens? I've heard they're super watchdogs that will alert everybody when they spot something out of whack.

April 19, 2012 at 2:00 PM  
Blogger Amanda said...

If you find that goats really are a welcome part of Cold Antler Farm, you might consider what we did. We had several disastrous poultry losses, not only chickens but ducks, guineas, and peacocks, until we changed things up as follows:

The chicken coop (shed) has a door large enough for pygmy goats to enter and exit. It's left open 24/7, 365 days a year. Surrounding the shed is a 4' tall chain link fence that borders/creates a "goat yard". The chickens can easily hop the fence (therefore, they remain "free range" in every sense of the word), but the goats stay put. I should mention that these are true pygmies, too short and stout to hop the fence. In bad weather, and every night, the goats file into the chicken coop.

Zero losses.

We know that there are still plenty of predators in the area.... we have turkeys and peacocks on the property who shun the coop, and we find piles of feathers or feet from time to time. The chickens, however, are safe.

Whichever route you choose - best of luck, get the nasty bugger!

April 19, 2012 at 3:40 PM  
Blogger Amanda said...

This comment has been removed by the author.

April 19, 2012 at 3:40 PM  
Blogger Kate said...

Ryan? I'm sorta attached the that fella. Think he'll recover? An age-old problem, isn't it, and it will go on and on as long as there are raccoons and farmers.

April 19, 2012 at 3:50 PM  
Blogger David said...

Normally racoons are tough to catch in a trap. They are smart. But I heard that if you bait a live trap with twinkies you can still catch them... something about the sweet smell brings them in. I tried it myself and caught several that way. (In our area, animal control will take care of them if you catch them in a trap.)

April 19, 2012 at 4:18 PM  
OpenID turningwheelfarm said...

One of the times I wish I could discharge a firearm within city limits is to get the fat raccoon that killed my two pet favorite chickens 2 years ago. No problems until this week and the raccoon got two out of 11 of my meat birds and I had to finally figure out a way to catch the chickens and put them in the garage till d-day. I tried a trap but all I caught were my own hens.

April 19, 2012 at 4:21 PM  
Anonymous Haley said...

We had major coon problems last year, but found that they are creatures of habit coming back the same time every night. We left the yard lights on and dozed with a 22 on the porch waiting for those thieves to come. Killed three last summer before they gave up. One was HUGE. They moved on to the garden after giving up on the chickens eating all my melons and squash and never could catch them there. At least I can regrow squash and melons, it's hard to regrow a chicken. Good luck nabbing those raccoons!

April 19, 2012 at 4:57 PM  
Blogger Lee Ann said...

Get 'em Jenna~ Take no prisoners! Nasty buggars...

April 19, 2012 at 7:50 PM  
Anonymous Tina said...

Switch to a shotgun.
I had guinea hens years ago....yes they are great 'alarms' but they tend to scream when they get startled at every little thing...
Ive lost hens to coons before and have learned to look them up tightly every night...no doors left open. Every morning I let them out. You know that even when you get one predator there's always another sooner or later.

April 19, 2012 at 8:31 PM  
OpenID Tami said...

Trap the coons, make coon skin caps and sell them in your farm store. I'd buy one!

April 19, 2012 at 9:12 PM  
Blogger livin life said...

Though not "green" (well maybe if you use a solar battery) and not "homestead-ish"...I use the poltry netting from Premier! One day I went out to check the chickens and you could tell that the coon had started to climb the netting and then got shocked...took some of the fence with it as it ran. No more issues! I would loved to see that shocking experience. And I love Premier electric poultry netting!!

Lora

April 19, 2012 at 9:21 PM  
Blogger CJ said...

Meredith A - What is your deal? I don't see a whole lot of farming going on on your blog. Perhaps you should re-read an older post of yours:

"I could not enjoy or even be raising pigs without the support, encouragement, and help provided by you all. This little farm on a farm is an asset in my life providing me endless joy and happiness.

I am grateful, thankful, and so very blessed. Or in blog talk....grateful, thankful, and blessed I am.

Thank you for supporting me and for supporting American agriculture!"

April 19, 2012 at 9:25 PM  
Anonymous Cindy Chambers said...

So sorry to hear about your chickens.
Loved your book Jenna. I wished it was longer!

April 19, 2012 at 11:04 PM  
Anonymous Cindy Chambers said...

So sorry to hear about your chickens.
Loved your book Jenna. I wished it was longer!

April 19, 2012 at 11:04 PM  
Blogger Percheronrider said...

So sorry for the loss of your chickens.

I'll say that a large guard dog, a Great Pyrenees is the ticket. I know someone who has two guarding her geese. The dogs have kept everything away, including hawks.

April 20, 2012 at 4:01 AM  
Blogger Trish Short Lewis said...

I agree about a guard dog. Our Maremma (huge white dog, looks a lot like a Great Pyanees and actually is bred from that breed) is a wonderful guard dog and no problems since we got him! :)

April 20, 2012 at 8:10 AM  
Blogger Trish Short Lewis said...

I agree about a guard dog. Our Gandalf has been a wonderful guard dog and no problems since he's been on the job!

April 20, 2012 at 8:11 AM  
Blogger Tiffrz-N-Kidz said...

A raccoon was the first animal I ever killed on purpose. TSSS - Trap, Shoot, Shovel, Shrug (if anyone asks about it).

April 20, 2012 at 1:27 PM  

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