Friday, February 17, 2012

freedom ranger update

Here is an update on the very wet Freedom Rangers. They are between 8-10 weeks old and thriving. On wet mornings they spend more time indoors with their food and water, but as the day warms and the sun comes out they get brave and explore about 20 yards around their haybale barn. The laying hens are far braver, but with such low forage about this time of year these guys stick close to their free lunch. They are all a bit damp because when I open the bale in the morning they all stream out, get wet in the rain, and walk around underfoot at my buckets of water and feed. It takes about 10 minutes to put down clean bedding, rinse and fill fresh fonts of water, and offer them about 5 pounds of food! Once the coop is cleaned, bedded, filled with treats and water they all seem to prefer it to the Laying Hen Bullies and cold and wet. Can't blame them. Comfy in there!

ordered these guys from www.freedomrangerhatchery.com

15 Comments:

Blogger J.D. said...

Wow, they are getting big! They seem so happy in the coup-de-bale.

Guess in the end all we need is good feed, water, warmth, and a nice dry bed.

Thanks, Jenna.

February 17, 2012 at 7:49 AM  
Blogger Jeremy said...

Bet they are outside today. I am 2 hours north and it is warm and sunny. The chickens are outside scratching and looking for a nice dry place to have a dust bath (good luck on that one)

February 17, 2012 at 8:12 AM  
Blogger Bovey Belle said...

That's a good set up for them and they're obviously thriving on it. Yeesh - that screech of metal on metal did for my fillings though!!!

February 17, 2012 at 8:56 AM  
Blogger Tara said...

They look great! We seemed to get an average 4 lb dress out on ours at about 12 weeks, so it sounds like yours are going at about the same pace. Honestly, I'd be holed up in the bale house too. ;)

February 17, 2012 at 9:51 AM  
OpenID barntalkblog said...

They look very content. I have a question, merely because I'm curious! Do the Rangers fight between themselves, like establish a pecking order?

-Autumn

February 17, 2012 at 11:16 AM  
Blogger Brittany said...

Love your video update. We have just gotten some Rhode Island Reds to add to our flock of Old English Games. We also have a white hen, not sure what breed, she was a gift. We also have bantams. Good luck with your chicks!

February 17, 2012 at 11:48 AM  
Blogger Kris said...

Thank you, Jenna. They look heavy already. You can tell they are a meatier bird than a laying hen for sure. So yeah, I think I will get some to try in the spring. They look great!

February 17, 2012 at 12:46 PM  
Blogger Kathy said...

About a month ago, I began realizing that we should learn how to live off the earth more, to give back, and to help each other, and it was almost a magic moment for me when I suddenly decided I could raise laying hens! I have read and studied, and I'm ready to begin constructing the facilities in my little back yard, for 5 hens. I am hoping to barter for materials, trade services, etc., and use all recycled things people just want to get rid of. After I return from a much needed vacation the end of March, I will have the Chicken Spa open for business!

But imagine my delight when, after wondering what the heck I might be getting into and if this would take up a lot of time I don't have, I read your statement in Chickens magazine: "Just start. Chickens aren't a big deal or a horrid responsibility. They are hardy, happy, and good for the home."

I hope that my small start blossoms as yours has, and I wish you continued luck and peace and happiness!!

February 17, 2012 at 1:29 PM  
Blogger Jeremy said...

Kathy,

Chickens are pretty darn easy. I started with a small coop built from scraps which cost about $10.00.

I now have a nice 8X8 permanent for the ladies, and a host of portable coops for my summer meat birds.

I have raised about 100 at this point, and only lost two to disease.

Just jump in, it will be fine

February 17, 2012 at 5:28 PM  
Blogger Jeremy said...

Kathy,

Chickens are pretty darn easy. I started with a small coop built from scraps which cost about $10.00.

I now have a nice 8X8 permanent for the ladies, and a host of portable coops for my summer meat birds.

I have raised about 100 at this point, and only lost two to disease.

Just jump in, it will be fine

February 17, 2012 at 5:34 PM  
Blogger Lara said...

Really, its a nice set up…very pretty birds too. Was listening with my headphones with the volume turned up and my ears are still ringing from that metal!

February 17, 2012 at 11:40 PM  
Blogger Elizabeth said...

Jenna-
How much would you say you have into those fat birds to date? $5 a piece? More?

February 18, 2012 at 10:45 AM  
Blogger Jennifer Montero said...

huh. We call the brown RIR hybrid layers 'freedom rangers' and 'farm rangers' in the UK.

Having looked out the window to see my flock halfway across a 30-acre field, looking like tiny chestnut-coloured dots, I had a 'A-ha' moment: I guess the 'Ranger' part of their name is descriptive.

February 18, 2012 at 10:59 AM  
Blogger sara said...

Now those look like very complacent birds! I hear you on the five pounds of feed, though. My meat flock is a bit diminished as we eliminate the roosters for the table, but they feast with great enthusiasm. I think they peck down something like 3 to 4 lbs of feed now. And I've had them outside since November. They piggie pile in the straw at night, in their coop's attached run.

February 18, 2012 at 3:37 PM  
Blogger maplestory said...

This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

February 27, 2012 at 1:11 AM  

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