Sunday, January 1, 2012

gibson is a beautiful springer spaniel

"That is a beautiful Springer Spaniel!" A stranger said to Gibson and I. He was in his forties with his young son outside a shop in downtown Cambridge. He then asked if it was okay to pet Gibson and I said sure, of course he could, and then I couldn't help myself. I introduced my dog as a Border Collie, not a Springer Spaniel.

The man instantly changed his demeanor from open and friendly to slightly abashed. It was subtle but clear as if someone dumped water on his face. I also corrected him in front of his young son. I was hit with a big ol' stick of realization...

This wasn't life-saving information, nor was it something that would show up in a voting booth or grocery list. He was not a dog professor or trainer, making a living off wrong information. And it's not like he was about to enter a game show and someone would flash dogs on a screen, and knowing what a border collie was by sight would win him a million dollar prize...

I had no reason to correct him so why did I do it? He was being perfectly happy and polite. If a 40-year-old man can't tell a springer spaniel from a sheepdog then he probably doesn't need to know (or care about) the difference. All I did in pointing out his mistake was possibly stop him from complimenting the next dog he saw. Possibly make him consider being friendly to the next stranger he meets with a puppy. That's a damn shame, to possibly stop a flow of kindness from a person. Already we are so rarely nice and open to strangers in this country. So many rarely go out of our way to tell people on the street kind things. And there I was, smiling through a smarmy rejoinder, correcting a stranger just because I could.

I just corrected someone in the post below because they called my hay straw. Why the heck did I need to do that? Soon as I saw it posted in reply my chest fell. There I go again... What if it stops that reader from commenting again, or another reader who was considering commenting stop because they don't want to make a mistake? We worry so much about perceptions already nowadays. Why am I adding to it?

Growing up takes the whole time, doesn't it?

The next time a person tells me I have a beautiful setter or pointer or mutt I am going to thank them and compliment them on their hair cut. This world needs a lot more sweetness in it.

Gibson really is a beautiful springer spaniel.

71 Comments:

Blogger Karen C said...

I read your comment in response to the reader who suggested "straw, not hay" and I appreciated the clarification. I didn't even know the difference between the two until a few years ago, and I too would have thought you'd be using straw bales, not hay. It helps to know straw (wheat) isn't grown out your way - something new I've learned. In any case, can't imagine anyone would be offended by your clarification, and I like learning something I didn't know before - thanks!

January 1, 2012 at 9:38 PM  
OpenID chickadeeworkshop said...

I see your point, and in the case of the man on the street, I agree with you, but in the case of correcting straw, not hay, on your website, perhaps it IS the right thing to do. Because people DO frequently come here for information...to learn what they can.

If you catch yourself in the stranger-on-the-street situation again, kindness, openness and such are definitely more important and it's great that you realized it. We are ALL still "works in progress." I am 60 and I still get angry at myself anytime I miss an opportunity for kindness or for uplifting someone along my way. You never know what their day has been like.

January 1, 2012 at 10:11 PM  
Blogger Tina - Our Rustic Roots said...

We all live and learn and grow. It's a good thing. :)

January 1, 2012 at 10:18 PM  
Blogger Misty said...

Incidentally Corrected, Yet Never offended.

I looked at the photo and it sure looked like straw at first glance. Typically straw is used for bale housing (human and animal), since it is less expensive, lighter in bale weight, and more of a "waste" material than hay used for animal fodder. And, with the hay/straw definition controversy of past blog posts (ie. even though cereal "straw" is considered a type of grass, it is the bare stalk leftover after the head of grain is removed, providing fiber but little nutrient. "Hay", however, is green grass and other pasture growth (clover, etc) that is cut and dried at the height of protein content and grown specifically for feeding), it seemed like the correct thing on which to comment.

All this is said knowing that substitutions can be made (using hay instead of straw), but usually the cost is prohibitive.

Learn all you can. But don't use just one source of information--do your own research, please.

January 1, 2012 at 10:31 PM  
Blogger Misty said...

This comment has been removed by the author.

January 1, 2012 at 10:35 PM  
Blogger herdinbc said...

I think people also want to learn and so being corrected is not always a bad thing. I would rather know the right type of dog or hay,than keep making a mistake. Rhonda

January 1, 2012 at 10:36 PM  
Blogger georgie said...

You did the right thing in both cases. I didn't know the difference between hay and straw until now.
I have standard poodles and people generally recognize the breed-except one lady who thought they were like Bo Obama!

January 1, 2012 at 10:37 PM  
Blogger Misty said...

That's a really nice English Shepherd you got there, lady! (grin)

January 1, 2012 at 10:38 PM  
Blogger Sense of Home Kitchen said...

Oh, how many times I have caught myself correcting someone and spent the rest of the day wishing I hadn't. I am now in my late 40s and still learning, but more often now I am just letting these little things go, and I tell myself that in the big picture it just does not matter. We have all been there.

~Brenda

January 1, 2012 at 10:38 PM  
Blogger Sense of Home Kitchen said...

Oh, how many times I have caught myself correcting someone and spent the rest of the day wishing I hadn't. I am now in my late 40s and still learning, but more often now I am just letting these little things go, and I tell myself that in the big picture it just does not matter. We have all been there.

~Brenda

January 1, 2012 at 10:40 PM  
Blogger pawsfurme said...

You actually DID say hay in your post about building the shelter. I was going to ask if you had meant straw when you corrected yourself in the comments.
I don't see any reason to not correct someone when they say something incorrect out of ignorance. I see it as an opportunity to educate when they might have otherwise gone their whole lives not knowing. I get a lot of incorrect comments or guesses on my Standard Poodle because he is in a non-traditional clip (a German clip...short ears, short tail, long legs and a beard). It gives me a chance to talk about him, or his breed, or we may go on to a completely different subject. I always get thanked afterwards. The key to not embarrass someone is to continue with educational material, don't just leave it at "he's a Border Collie". Talk about him, what he does, farm stuff, your books, etc. Lead the conversation to pique their interest. Doesn't usually take much, especially when you have shall we say...odd interests (I'm full of them).
You would be doing them an UNkindness to remove their chance to something new. All of life is about broadening one's education. :)

January 1, 2012 at 10:45 PM  
Blogger pawsfurme said...

Oops. to LEARN something new. Poor self proofreading. :)

January 1, 2012 at 10:48 PM  
Blogger Katie Swanberg said...

I know that feeling all too well. It takes a few of those instances to make us realize there is a difference between being happy and being right. Choosing happiness is a growing up process....

January 2, 2012 at 12:21 AM  
Blogger bree said...

I enjoyed this piece. Very insightful Jenna. You have given us something to think about. Wonderful.

January 2, 2012 at 12:22 AM  
Blogger redbird said...

Well said—I’ve gathered a lot of food for thought and open-mindedness from you the past few days. Thank you.

And Happy New Year…!

January 2, 2012 at 1:12 AM  
Blogger Karen said...

I'm with Pawsfurme on this one. I would want to be educated. It would depend how you corrected the man. It could easily be done in friendly, educational fashion. By not saying anything, he might go up to another border collie owner and say the same thing. If he was corrected that time, it might make him feel embarrassed that he also called your dog a Springer Spaniel, and was left none the wiser.

January 2, 2012 at 3:16 AM  
Blogger Nanette said...

Well, I think the guy could've said something too, it was a conversation after all. Even if abashed, he could've said he'd never seen a border collie and then asked some questions. His kid learnt when you're wrong about something,you go quiet and back off, not that it's ok, and here's something to learn.

I agree with pawsfurme, it's ok to correct someone, then add some information.

Stop beating yourself up.

January 2, 2012 at 3:54 AM  
Blogger doglady said...

If the gentleman couldn't take the correction of Gibson's breed, that is his problem not yours and it goes a lot deeper than your casual street conversation. Gracefully accepting your correction and continuing the conversation would have been a much better life lesson for the son than Daddy is always right.
Hay vs straw, is important in a blog dedicated to farming. So really what is the chicken shelter being made from. It looked like hay in the photo.

January 2, 2012 at 7:20 AM  
Blogger Ashley DeMazza said...

You make an excellent point Jenna. We have all had those "bite out tongues" moments. I try to remind myself I don't have to say everything I think. Can't say I have it all down pat yet though.

Ashley DeMazza
Falls Village, CT

January 2, 2012 at 7:31 AM  
Blogger doglady said...

You can usually purchase baled straw at the farm supply stores. I use it to mulch my garlic and rhubarb, in my chicken yard over the snow,in the rabbit nesting boxes and in the turkey house. When its first use is complete, it makes a nice mulch in the garden and tills in later. Hay used in the chicken yard works just as well and they eat the green sprigs. As a rabbit bedding it is a liability for newborn kits as it absorbs atmospheric moisture and doesn't insulate. As a garden mulch it introduces seeds we don't want.

January 2, 2012 at 7:31 AM  
Blogger E said...

Well said and so true.

chickadeeworkshop also has good points.

There are different standards to hold each other and ourselves to in different situations (blog vs idle conversation, book vs chat, farmers together vs customers). As an author you know that words and concepts are not randomly interchangeable.

Three cheers for more kindness!

January 2, 2012 at 7:37 AM  
Blogger Barbara Dykes said...

It happens. As you get older, it will still happen but a lot less. You will learn to not say anything but every once in a while, it will still slip. I'm 50 now and it still pops out and makes me mad at myself. Don't be too hard on yourself. You are an incrediable person with a reason.

January 2, 2012 at 8:27 AM  
Blogger PansWife said...

There is a different between being a know-it-all and supplying a little corrective information. I don't think you did anything wrong. You didn't call him an idiot and the gentleman should have accepted your comment in the spirit it was given - which I think was really a friendly FYI.

January 2, 2012 at 8:31 AM  
Blogger Matt B said...

I know what you mean. As I was walking to my truck on lunch the other day a guy in another truck about 15 feet away said "Hey! Beautiful day ain't it?!" I looked at him and said "A bit chilly, but yeah it is". He just looked at me. When I got in my truck I thought "Why did I start my reply with a negative comment. I should have said 'It sure is!' and let that be it". ...live and learn.

January 2, 2012 at 8:57 AM  
Blogger Sewing Machine Girl said...

umm, Dad can put his big boy pants on and give his son the example of life long learning. Why pray tell must we all walk around in ignorance and error, deluded in the estimation of our own perfection? Yes, growing up takes a long time, and if teachers ceased offering truth, we would all be screwed. Telling the correct information doesn't make you the bad person, if any such person exists in that whole exchange. There is mistaken perception nowadays to protect everyone's feelings so we can all feel good. This doesn't work, as I believe it is more damaging to be ignorant. No need to be pushy or a blow hard about it, but if you are entering the mode of teaching people about farming or your lifestyle it is hard to shut this teacher motor off.

It is a judgement call when to correct someone, if at all, and definitely a learning experience that we all have on both sides of the discussion.

Happy New Year!

January 2, 2012 at 9:14 AM  
Blogger Building A Better Life said...

There's a big difference between straw and hay. Straw can be used for bedding, hay for animal feed. Straw is for building, hay for animal feed. Straw is less expensive, hay is not. Straw is what is left over when after wheat is threshed, which makes it unsuitable for animal feed.

Many people don't know that, and a polite correction on that point is important. I probably would have corrected about the dog, too, and I don't know how you did - if it came across as condescending. Just remember, be nice about it. Something like, "he is gorgeous, isn't he? But you know he's actually a border collie." You could open up a conversation for a 5-minute (or lifetime) friendship instead of shutting it down before it even has a chance.

January 2, 2012 at 9:26 AM  
Blogger Mimi's Tapawingo said...

Thank you.

January 2, 2012 at 9:33 AM  
Blogger Odie Langley said...

Great post Jenna and there sure is a lesson in it for us all.

January 2, 2012 at 10:05 AM  
Blogger Jimmie said...

I agree with some of the other posters. The spirit in which the correction is made makes all the difference. If the man took offense at being educated, then maybe he needs to quit wearing his feelings on his shoulder. If you had corrected him in a "holier than thou" tone, that would be another matter. BUT, I know you didn't do that.

You can't change the stripes on a zebra. You keep on giving information, teaching, sharing in the way that you have in the past. You're a considerate soul; I just know that.

Diane in North Carolina

January 2, 2012 at 10:17 AM  
Blogger Jimmie said...

I agree with some of the other posters. The spirit in which the correction is made makes all the difference. If the man took offense at being educated, then maybe he needs to quit wearing his feelings on his shoulder. If you had corrected him in a "holier than thou" tone, that would be another matter. BUT, I know you didn't do that.

You can't change the stripes on a zebra. You keep on giving information, teaching, sharing in the way that you have in the past. You're a considerate soul; I just know that.

Diane in North Carolina

January 2, 2012 at 10:18 AM  
Blogger Margie said...

Yes, but some of us were born to be hall monitors. We can't help it.
To be Southern at a time like that is good. You can give your sweetest smile and put on the thickest accent and say something like, "Well, bless your heart, Honey, he does look like a little like a Springer Spaniel, doesn't it? They told me he ws a bordie collie when I got him. You think they told me wrong? Perhaps I need to check on it." Then walk away with that dazzling smile and a little wave.

January 2, 2012 at 10:23 AM  
Blogger Margie said...

Note to self. Reread, before posting. Border, not bordie.
An old English teacher should know better.

January 2, 2012 at 10:28 AM  
Blogger Patsy said...

I have corrected when I shouldn't have and been corrected when it wasn't necessary. Both times were a learning experience. God bless.

January 2, 2012 at 10:48 AM  
Blogger Diane said...

I'm with you 100 percent on this one, Jenna. So much easier, peaceful and more congenial to just let it go, smile and give a compliment back. Kudos to you, and thanks for the reminder. The world would be a happier place if we all did this! : )

January 2, 2012 at 11:09 AM  
Blogger 10a said...

Sorry, disagree here. I think the one who gets upset by being corrected needs the growing up, not the one giving the accurate information.

I mean, before you spoke you didn't exactly grab his collar with both hands and put your face in front of his, did you? (you didn't...).

January 2, 2012 at 11:43 AM  
Blogger Tara said...

I don't see it that way at all. Interactions such as yours with this man are part of how we learn. I'd be pretty upset if I made the same incorrect assumption my whole life (no matter how trivial) and no one felt compelled to correct me. I seriously doubt he'll stop complimenting other dogs. He just might say "What a beautiful DOG." ;-)

January 2, 2012 at 11:55 AM  
Blogger luckybunny said...

I really wouldn't worry about it! I worry about things like that too - but it's not a big deal, especially if you are nice about it. I wouldn't have been able to let that go - the Springer Spaniel thing. Just don't tell the guy he's a dummie! :) Things said nicely are fine - I'd rather be corrected than think somethings that not correct - and make a mistake that would really embarrass me instead of one that would only slightly! We all make mistakes, and need to accept being corrected - in a nice way, when someone is really rude about it, then I can understand it hurting them. You are fine!

January 2, 2012 at 12:11 PM  
Blogger Geeka said...

AFAIAC, you didn't correct him, you gave him a piece of knowledge that he didn't have before. Imagine how nicer the world would be if we all learned something new every time we interacted with someone.

I had a Brittany Spaniel/Border Collie mix for years. People used to comment to me that she must be very smart because Border Collies are smart dogs, then she'd do something dumb like walk into a mailbox. :)

January 2, 2012 at 12:23 PM  
Blogger Geeka said...

AFAIAC, you didn't correct him, you gave him a piece of knowledge that he didn't have before. Imagine how nicer the world would be if we all learned something new every time we interacted with someone.

I had a Brittany Spaniel/Border Collie mix for years. People used to comment to me that she must be very smart because Border Collies are smart dogs, then she'd do something dumb like walk into a mailbox. :)

January 2, 2012 at 12:24 PM  
Blogger Chicky said...

Also with you 100% on this one. I've been harshly corrected by people for insignificant things & it's so upsetting, I find myself retaliating with my own corrections of other people...and it's an awful feeling. If it's not an important piece of information, let it go.

January 2, 2012 at 1:25 PM  
Blogger bookkm said...

Jenna, thanks for this post. Growing up does indeed take the whole time. This is something that a lot of people do. It's hard to keep quiet when you can share knowledge even if the knowledge seems unimportant.

So, now you know you don't have to correct strangers about inconsequential - to them - things. Just don't expect to stop doing it right away. Like you said. Growing up...

January 2, 2012 at 1:32 PM  
Blogger Jackiet said...

But I too have not corrected someone who mistook the breed of my dog etc, for just that reason, only for them to correct themselves. I ended up looking like the one who didn't know what sort of dog I had! You can't win....

January 2, 2012 at 4:27 PM  
Blogger Jackiet said...

But I too have not corrected someone who mistook the breed of my dog etc, for just that reason, only for them to correct themselves. I ended up looking like the one who didn't know what sort of dog I had! You can't win....

January 2, 2012 at 4:28 PM  
Blogger Connie said...

Wonderful post today, and an important reminder to me that being kind is often more important than being right. Thank you for the lesson!

January 2, 2012 at 4:31 PM  
Blogger Lisa said...

Hi Jenna.
My husband and I have a 175lb Irish Wolfhound who stands 36 inches at the shoulder. I would say that 97% of the time we take him ANYWHERE (including on a walk down our rural road in Maine) we have a conversation very similar to the one you had regarding Gibson. As IW's are not the most common breed around, we have all sorts of guesses (and the occasional "proclamation") as to what breed he must be. I have found that people usually really want to know his breed and if they don't guess the right breed, we just say he is an Irish Wolfhound and tell them about the breed. I think that if people stop and want to ask you about your dog, it is because they are truly interested and if they are truly interested, then they are interested in learning about your dog and its breed. I agree with others-so long as you present the correct information in an educational way, that is fine. :)
Lisa in Maine

January 2, 2012 at 5:54 PM  
Blogger Lilly said...

Oh goodness, I have so felt this way. I still flush when remembering some of the officious corrections I've made to people and then instantly wondered why I couldn't have made a more tactful response. I once made a truly snarky, but totally unintended to be that way, response to a very high-up man in my industry and I have regretted it to this day. Learning to hold my tongue is truly a challenge for me. As my Mom says, better to have good manners than to have good grammar (pronounciation, knowledge of dog breeds, etc.). Although a stranger once complimented my sister on her beautiful Corgi that was actually a Jack Russell. Never could figure out that one.

January 2, 2012 at 6:01 PM  
Blogger Jburd said...

i can relate! folks see my Italian Greyhound and call it a Whippet. Most of the time we get an opportunity to explain the three different breeds of greyhound; sometimes we just don't say anything. keep up the good work - enjoy your blog!

January 2, 2012 at 6:11 PM  
Blogger Barbara said...

Yours is the first blog I read in this new year...I am glad I did! What a lovely insight and such truth. I love it when Thumper tells Bambi what his Mama told him..."If you can't say something nice, don't say nothing at all"! I think that's a great philosophy, one I try to live by. :0)

January 2, 2012 at 6:39 PM  
Blogger Barbara said...

Yours is the first blog I read in this new year...I am glad I did! What a lovely insight and such truth. I love it when Thumper tells Bambi what his Mama told him..."If you can't say something nice, don't say nothing at all"! I think that's a great philosophy, one I try to live by. :0)

January 2, 2012 at 6:44 PM  
Blogger SWEETHEARTS MOM said...

Actually you are in teaching mode girl. The purpose of your blog, your workshops, and your books is to teach people. Sometimes switching that off is very hard to do.

January 2, 2012 at 7:31 PM  
Blogger KellyV (Kelly the Fifth) said...

I see this a little differently. Jenna is a teacher. It is very difficult to turn that off. The man was silly. Who of us would care if someone corrected our assumption about a dog's breed? I think it was his problem not Jenna's. While I think it is important to be as sensitive as possible about people's feelings, I think teaching is more important at times. I had absolutely no idea hay and straw were different - not part of my city girl knowledge. So thanks Miss Jenna.

January 2, 2012 at 7:48 PM  
Blogger Tiffrz-N-Kidz said...

Let there be peace on Earth, and let it begin with me.

January 2, 2012 at 8:02 PM  
Blogger mary said...

I have 2 border collies. One looks like your typical Border Collie, black and white with a white collar. The other looks alot like an Australian Shepard. When people comment on them I just say, they are both Border Collies. Border Collies, as I am sure you know, are bred for their brains, not their beauty and they look different all the time...I agree that it was a teaching moment so don't beat yourself over it. I probably would have said the same thing.

January 2, 2012 at 8:07 PM  
Blogger Dawn said...

It's so easy to worry about being right more than being nice when it seems like the latter really makes the most difference in everyday interactions. If it's a learning situation where you are being sought out for your expertise, that's one thing. But, so often, people are just making conversation and a little kindness is all they really want. Thanks for such a thoughtful and humble post.

January 2, 2012 at 8:20 PM  
Blogger jim said...

i agree with Connie, this was a zero issue with Jenna, she knows what Gibson is and the fellow was just making a complimentary comment about her dog, I wouldn't have corrected him, but probably said i agree, he is beautiful-nothing gained here putting him down. To many of us think our function in life is to correct others, surprise, it is not.

January 2, 2012 at 8:50 PM  
Blogger Jenn said...

What a great read Jenna! I can see both sides to this story, while I completely agree that it would be lovely to just take a strangers kind words (albeit, incorrect ones), add my own kindness and just be greatful for kind strangers, I can also see where other posters are saying that it isn't right to be tippy toeing around others, in the off chance of offending. Perhaps this strangers could be appreciative of this new information you have him, and to show his son that sometimes you're incorrect, but you learn something new, and to accept it with a smile and a nod. Really enjoyed this piece of perspective today!

January 2, 2012 at 8:54 PM  
Blogger City Girl said...

Hi, Jenna. On a totally different topic, the Christmas card and heffer donation that I mailed to you from San Francisco came back as undeliverable. Boo. Not sure why the address you posted on your blog -- even with the corrected zip code -- didn't work. Did other readers have that problem??

January 2, 2012 at 10:59 PM  
Blogger Tiffrz-N-Kidz said...

Mine came back, too. I was gonna ask if there was a different address.

January 2, 2012 at 11:31 PM  
Blogger Hawk Reader said...

Gosh, intellectual chemistries can be fickle can't they? Maybe pride is behind the friction of your exchange with the man.

Your pride in your dog collided with his pride of having a tidbit of information for his little boy. As the 40-ish dad of two small kids, I can relate to that.

But pride completely aside, it's also very likely that he knew exactly what kind of dog Gibson is, but merely misspoke his breed. Then, in order not to alter his own pronouncement, he stuck to his story and his pique was at you for exposing the situation, which was actually due to his mistaken, which arose out of his brain glitch. I know I've misspoken before and I'm sure this goes on all the time, people being what they are. Probably the guy wasn't as upset about being corrected as he was about his thinking the correct term for Gibson's breed and saying another, then being corrected, which highlighted some kind of momentary cognitive slippage on his part. He may even have thought the correct breed and thought he said it aloud, not realizing he had misspoke. Some people do this more often than others. I've misspoke and only realized I'd said the wrong word when my ears heard the sound my mouth made. Humans aren't machines, thank goodness...

January 3, 2012 at 7:52 AM  
Blogger Catcoco said...

Food for thought... Thank you, Jenna... and have a wonderful year !

January 3, 2012 at 8:38 AM  
Blogger Stevie Taylor said...

Correction doesn't bother me or embarrass me since I am used to being wrong. Or clueless. We get lots of questions when people are visiting our farm when I have to say, "Um, I don't really know. The only animal breeds I know about are ours, the only methods I know that work are the ones that are working for us, and anything else is just a good guess." Most people respect that :)
Stevie @ ruffledfeathersandspilledmilk.com

January 3, 2012 at 8:46 AM  
Blogger chesapeake said...

People always thought our dog was a poodle or a maltese. We would say "oh, actually he is a bichon, but they do look similar" even though they pretty much don't. People would usually laugh and the conversation would continue.

I agree with pawsfurme. It is more the way it is done to correct than the correcting itself. Better to have the right info than for him to err twice and feel doubly embarrassed.

January 3, 2012 at 10:28 AM  
Blogger Shaolin said...

I agree with you Jenna, it would have been better to let the man save face he was with his son after all. Live and learn. But it shows a kind and considerate spirit within in you that you were even self aware enough to care about how your words might have affected someone else. That shows growth.

Be Well, Shaolin

January 3, 2012 at 11:11 AM  
Blogger Jenna said...

Gibson is a beautiful springer spaniel

January 3, 2012 at 12:33 PM  
OpenID wonanee said...

Jenna,
Your post made me think of a great song I like to listen to when I've done or said something rude, stupid, inconsiderate, or take your pick. Maybe you've heard it, if not check it out.

"We All Need More Kindness in this World", by Guy Davis

January 3, 2012 at 4:29 PM  
Blogger MsPieway said...

Please don't be too hard on yourself. I am sure you did not say it in a mean tone.

January 3, 2012 at 7:28 PM  
Blogger Michael said...

"I just corrected someone in the post below because they called my hay straw. Why the heck did I need to do that? Soon as I saw it posted in reply my chest fell. There I go again... What if it stops that reader from commenting again"

If someone leaves in a huff because you did something educational on blog that, at least in part, serves to educate people about farming, I wouldn't sweat it.

January 3, 2012 at 8:20 PM  
Blogger Lee said...

Growing up, like life, is a journey, not a destination. I'm 49 and still getting comfortable with my humanity. Congrats on your growing mindfulness.

January 4, 2012 at 8:27 AM  
Blogger Kate said...

I can so relate to this post and have found myself doing the same thing and I am committed to letting go. If we choose to see the kindness then nothing else really matters.

January 4, 2012 at 10:40 AM  
Blogger Big Sky Chicken Ranch and Victory Garden said...

Hey! I mean Hay! I know the difference, but I can't seem to make the word "straw" come out of my mouth. It always comes out "Hay!" HAHA.

January 4, 2012 at 4:17 PM  
Blogger CK said...

The post title really caught my eye since I do own a beautiful spring spaniel. :)
Keep up your honesty and transparency. I too have been reminded lately to err on the side of grace in dealing with others (and myself).
And I just loved the line "growing up takes the whole damn time, doesn't it?". That's a keeper! Maybe worth tatooing on my forehead.

January 5, 2012 at 6:46 PM  

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