Sunday, September 11, 2011

finally!

37 Comments:

Blogger CallieK said...

Looks lovely! Bet you can't wait for a nice chilly day to enjoy it!

September 11, 2011 at 2:07 PM  
Blogger GerriHultgren said...

It looks wonderful..I am jealous( in a good way)...

September 11, 2011 at 2:13 PM  
Blogger seagoddess said...

I'm curious as to how much wood you need to know how to have for a winter. Do you base it on a month's supply? Or speculate you'd use this from say October through April? Also what type of stove is this? It looks great! Congratulations.

September 11, 2011 at 2:27 PM  
Blogger Penny said...

Big Yay!

September 11, 2011 at 2:29 PM  
Blogger Jenna said...

Not sure Seagoddess, this is my first year with two woodstoves. I bought three cords and then some, more on the way.

It is a Vermont Bun Baker, the top is a stove and the bottom is a bread oven! the very top has removable burners for cooking too!

September 11, 2011 at 2:35 PM  
Blogger Dalesgirl said...

It is beautiful - I have stove envy. Looking forward to wintry pictures of it in action.

September 11, 2011 at 2:55 PM  
Blogger kandy Gray said...

my parents heated with wood; an old 9 room house took 18 true cords for 1 wood stove.

September 11, 2011 at 3:23 PM  
Blogger Dahlia ChanTang said...

Yay!! Looks lovely. Wish I had a wood stove.

September 11, 2011 at 3:54 PM  
Blogger seagoddess said...

What a great investment!

September 11, 2011 at 3:56 PM  
Blogger Elizabeth said...

I'm in love with your Bun Baker and looking forward to read your stories about this beautiful assett your farm.

September 11, 2011 at 3:59 PM  
Blogger Ruth @ Hope, Joy and Faith Farm said...

Oh what a wonderful stove. I love my wood stove, but I'd love one with an oven in it. What is that on top of it?

September 11, 2011 at 4:02 PM  
Blogger Kris said...

Very nice! I am so happy for you. I know you will be so warm with this stove.

September 11, 2011 at 5:24 PM  
Blogger Kathy P. said...

Looks toasty even in September! Question: how come the little plastic sheep doesn't melt?

September 11, 2011 at 5:54 PM  
Blogger Tara said...

YAY!

September 11, 2011 at 6:06 PM  
Blogger Debi said...

It's beautiful...can't wait to see all the goodies that come out of it!

We heated solely with wood when I was a kid, and I think we went through the better part of 20 cord a winter. Of course it was about 80 degrees in the house all winter long, so I imagine that you could get by on less.

September 11, 2011 at 6:09 PM  
Blogger Sewing Machine Girl said...

@seagoddess. I have see the quest for enough wood turn into an obsession. I have an uncle that lives in Oxford Cty, ME who has a woodpile about 4ft high, 4ft deep and every bit of 1000 ft long covered with pieces of tin roof. He has a wood boiler in the basement where most people have home heating oil boilers. He does have a large woodlot and works on the pile all summer. Excess solves the question! Jenna- looks lovely congratulations! Take my sewing advice and look for a window treatment for that sliding glass door. There is a product called "Warm Window" that my mom made roman shades with and it has a radiant barrier built in. I can verify that it keeps the heat in. We love the stuff!

September 11, 2011 at 6:09 PM  
Blogger Tara said...

Seagoddess - it depends on all sorts of factors. Where you live, the size of your house, how many stoves you're running and how often, etc. I'm in Texas, we have a tiny house and one smallish stove, and we go through about three cords on average in a winter. We heat from mid to late October through about mid March, with the most use being in Jan-Feb. Obviously for someone in the north, it will be, um, more. ;-)

September 11, 2011 at 6:10 PM  
Blogger Joleen said...

Lovely and cozy.

September 11, 2011 at 6:36 PM  
Blogger CJ said...

Looks very nice.

Just curious - did they give you a wind rating on the section of chimney that extends up above the lowest point of the roof? Never used a metal chimney before, I would be interested to know what they are rated for.

September 11, 2011 at 7:40 PM  
Blogger kandy Gray said...

CJ= what is a wind rating? how much wind before it blows off? quite serious, im looking to put in a wood stove in the near future

September 11, 2011 at 8:26 PM  
Blogger MollyKnits said...

that is the stove I want!!! Keep us posted on all the wonderful things you bake while your home stays toasty warm.

September 11, 2011 at 9:39 PM  
Blogger Jenna said...

Kandy: did it have no insulation and giant cielings!?!?! I don't know a single person who burned more than 6 here in the North Country, and they had HUGE houses!

The cielings here are 8 feet high (7 in the kitchen) and the walls deeply insulated. I will be running the stove winter weekends and weeknights, and hoping both help cut down on oil costs.

September 11, 2011 at 10:14 PM  
Blogger Jenna said...

Ruth: that's an iron sheep decoration I put on there.

September 11, 2011 at 10:14 PM  
Blogger Jenna said...

CJ, I will ask, but it is held in place with steel brackets now, looks weird, but solid. The inspector was impressed!

September 11, 2011 at 10:17 PM  
Blogger Firecracker Farm said...

WooHoo!
That there is a genuine Bun Baking fire.
Congratulations!

September 11, 2011 at 10:38 PM  
Blogger Thistledog said...

I just got my little soapstone woodstove set in with chimney and stove pipe in the farmhouse, ready to go for the coming winter. Took me three years. I really know how good this makes you feel!

September 11, 2011 at 10:58 PM  
Blogger kandy Gray said...

jenna- na, when i say old house i mean old house. it was a 1 room summer cottage 150 years ago that previous owners added on to as needed until it reached 9 rooms. also on the waterfront, in Quebec, and they heated the hole house all winter (november to april basically )

but it was insulated properly (in the walls and roof, not in the crawl-space basement). they re insulated when they found out that the walls were filled with old baby cloths, newspaper and horse hair that had settled to about 4 feet from the floor to the ceiling.....

now they live in a nice new home and heat with propane, i am very happy about that.

September 11, 2011 at 11:45 PM  
Blogger Peacemom said...

Congrats! Please let us know how the baking feature works on it, that would be so good to have when the power goes out (I say when-not if-the power goes out, because, well, you know..:^) ~Vonnie

September 12, 2011 at 5:47 AM  
Blogger sloejennfizz said...

So you don't need heat shields on the walls? Is that because it sits a little further into the room?

September 12, 2011 at 6:51 AM  
Blogger Lisa said...

Congrats Jenna! That is my dream stove. It looks amazing!

September 12, 2011 at 8:03 AM  
Blogger CJ said...

Yes wind rating is how much wind the structure can withstand. With antennas there is usually two numbers, one is max wind and the other is max wind with some amount of ice. I would assume they tied the upper part of the structure into the roof, but in the picture there wasn't any yet so I was just curious.

September 12, 2011 at 8:20 AM  
Blogger CJ said...

We burn 12 - 16 cords of wood, but we don't use any oil - we have it as backup but have burned any in two years.

We burn year round for heat and hot water and have 4 solar hot water panels on the roof to pre-heat the water before it enters the wood boiler.

September 12, 2011 at 8:23 AM  
Blogger seagoddess said...

All good information - thank you!

September 12, 2011 at 3:09 PM  
Blogger Kimberlie Ott said...

oh sooo beautiful!!!

September 12, 2011 at 5:43 PM  
Blogger candisrrt said...

OMG! That is beautiful! I was shocked as how excited I was when I saw it. You should be so proud.

September 12, 2011 at 7:33 PM  
Blogger Jamie said...

Congrats! It looks amazing!

September 12, 2011 at 9:29 PM  
Blogger Paula said...

Yay wood heat! It's the coziest. Congratulations on getting yours!

September 13, 2011 at 12:49 AM  

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