Thursday, July 1, 2010

wool day

This morning I loaded up the back of the pickup with two season's of wool from my sheep: six fleeces total. Loading that pickup bed while the sheep watched from their new pen, my border collie pup in the front seat, damn it felt good.

I'll be boxing it and mailing it to Connecticut today to a processor who will turn it into yarn. The yard will be mailed back in a few weeks. I don't know how many skeins I'll get, but it'll be a lot. (That's almost fifty pounds of raw wool back there!) Enough to stock up my cabinets and keep me knitting all winter. Also, I hope to save some to sell at markets and wool festivals. I can't wait to get that package back from the mill. And it's a big step for the farm as well. I've been eating veggies and meat off the farm for a while, but now I'll be able to produce a bit of clothing from the backyard to boot.

17 Comments:

Blogger Affi'enia said...

Mmm fresh wool. I went to a wool festival this weekend just gone and there is nothing quite so nice as pure wool. You going to have a go at dying it yourself or just leaving it pure?

July 1, 2010 at 1:14 PM  
Blogger Susan said...

Nice looking fleeces! It's such a great feeling - this self-sufficiency - isn't it? That's going to make some darn fine yarn.

July 1, 2010 at 1:28 PM  
Blogger Geek 3000 said...

Hey how much does it cost to get wool processed? I do it myself sometimes, but I am a terrible spinner!

July 1, 2010 at 2:01 PM  
Blogger DarcC said...

Wonderful progress! I just brought home four laying hens last night, now I'm on my way too!

July 1, 2010 at 2:06 PM  
Blogger Debi said...

Beautiful wool....I can't wait to see the finished product!
I't amazing how these small things can make a person so happy. I found out today that my entire back hedge is filled with wild black berries! A gift from the Universe, and one more small step towards self sufficiency for this wanna be urban homesteader!

Blessings,
Debi

July 1, 2010 at 3:38 PM  
Blogger Kathleen Stoltzfus said...

Could you share who your processor is?

July 1, 2010 at 3:46 PM  
Blogger Crystal said...

That looks so amazing! Monday I'm driving out to pick up two new angora does and to get a three hour lesson on spining on a wheel. I'm probably picking one up then too. It is something else. I can't wait to see the yarn I'll make with the wool I pulled off my two bucks.

Then, super bonus, she's going to let me play with her Alpacas while I'm there. I'm so giddy!

Crystal

July 1, 2010 at 4:11 PM  
Blogger Jenna said...

http://www.stillrivermill.com/

is where I hope to process it.

July 1, 2010 at 4:16 PM  
Blogger Plain and Joyful Living said...

I am eager to learn how many skeins you get from that - six sheep right?
Warm wishes, Tonya

July 1, 2010 at 5:47 PM  
Blogger Norma from Misty Haven Alpacas said...

Yeah! Congrats on sending your first fleeces to the mill. I know it's a great feeling. You are lucky to be able to expect the yarn back so quick. The small mills in Ontario seem to be backed up 6 months or so.
I really enjoy your blog.

July 1, 2010 at 6:33 PM  
Blogger Jenna said...

oh, i have no idea when i'll get it back!!

July 1, 2010 at 6:44 PM  
OpenID urbanadaptation said...

Looks great - I bought some wool recently, but I envy you being able to produce your own now.

July 1, 2010 at 7:36 PM  
Blogger 韋志韋志 said...

成熟,就是有能力適應生活中的模糊。....................................................................

July 1, 2010 at 8:26 PM  
Blogger Worm said...

Will you be having any of it dyed?? How very exciting!! Yet another inspiring event from CAF. Keep up the great work!

July 1, 2010 at 10:49 PM  
Blogger Paula said...

Very cool, the steps you are taking to self-sufficiency....

July 2, 2010 at 1:33 AM  
Blogger wendita said...

Have you thought of selling some of that yarn on your etsy site? I can think of at least one person who'd love to buy a skein or two!

July 2, 2010 at 11:12 AM  
Blogger Fresh Eggs Farm said...

Miss Jenna - It looks like a lot of us are VERY interested in this whole process! Once you make your way through and get an idea of the cost, the time frame and the end result (how much yarn) - could you put together an all-inclusive blog?

I know you get bummed out and frustrated about starting your farm - but know that all of us are sharing your pain. It is amazing to see a young woman do all that you are doing. I can't wait to own a little piece of my farm Heaven too - for now, I'll have to keep reading blogs like yours and Rurally Screwed and others to get my farm fix.

July 8, 2010 at 12:49 AM  

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