Friday, June 11, 2010

as i get older

It's been unseasonably chilly here in Veryork. Nights dip into the low 40's and sometimes days are barely sixty degrees. Jackson is cold and wet. I love it. I am a huge fan of humidity and precipitation. Overcast days, green hills, rain, wind, sheep—I adore them all. I should marry a Scott with a black hill dog. He'd get me.

The Bourbon Reds are doing amazingly well. Hands down the healthiest poultry I ever raised. Loud as church bells, bright eyed and alert, they are going to be fine table birds. And they're some of the first heritage livestock being raised for the table here, and that's exciting in itself. The Scottish Blackface sheep are next. I'll be loading up the truck this weekend for a road trip to Barb Armata's farm down in Esperance to meet my future flock. I'm really excited about this breed. They're very hearty hill sheep, and something about them suits me. I'm the same way about the highland cattle (I met three highland steers tonight in Cambridge by the way, another story for another time). Between them, the blackface, and the border collies I feel like Cold Antler is going to need its own tartan...

There's still trouble in paradise. The fox is still here, taking lives. The meat rabbit kits fell ill with something (bloat, I think) and are recovering on hay and spring water. I'm not sure how, but the young meat stock became sickly and got diarrhea. The angoras are all well, but I've separated them and am monitoring their feed and care extra closely. They seem fine but thinner than I'd like. I'm waiting to sell them until they are bright and I'm 100% sure they aren't suspect. I'll keep you posted but I think it was a simple intestinal issue that some of the younger rabbits simply couldn't fight it off. I lost two. My rabbitry is around 20 animals now, and on the mend.

I've decided to slow down a bit, be a little more realistic about my abilities. The garden isn't being expanded anymore. No corn this year (boo), but there will still be pumpkins (I demand pumpkins) and plenty of lettuce, onions, broc, and tomatoes. I discovered a USDA butcher one town over that will process my poultry (from clucking chicken to shrink-wrap) for three dollars a bird. It's not that I can't do it here, but after the food poisoning (which I think came from careless chicken processing at home) I think I will let the pros have at it. The fox has eaten half of my current meat bird crop but I am keeping them locked up best I can and building a pen. I am doing my best.

This year, I have to chalk up so much as experience and lessons.

I know a lot of folks read about things like the fox, or bloat in the rabbits, and shake their heads at me. But please understand that I only share the stories of dogs eating chickens, or sick animals, or bear-eaten hives, or any of the messy stuff to show that this life (and lifestyle) isn't perfect. I get hurt and sick. Animals die. Crops wither from blight. Sometimes it's lonely. As wonderful as a small farm is it's a morality play 78% of the time. Sick rabbits, predators, ramming sheep, electric fencing hives, all of it is part of the play and it's never simple....

I am learning to farm and sometimes it's not pretty. Mistakes are part of that education. I need to accept that and appreciate what I gain in understanding what not to do. I only ask you refrain from judging the new kid for a few years.

I'll get better as I get older. I hope.

photo from wikipedia

48 Comments:

Blogger Snyder's Homestead said...

Who is without sin cast the first stone....We all have made mistakes in our lives whether it be rearing children, relationships, etc. People should not judge until they walk in your shoes. We all try to do the best we can as farmers. But things happen. How do we learn as people if things don't happen. You know I love ya Jenna and I KNOW first hand you are an animal lover at heart and only have their best interest. Thats why living the simple life isn't so "simple" :)

June 11, 2010 at 10:16 PM  
Blogger make 365 things said...

Jenna, Your honesty has helped me and brought me comfort. Ignore critical people...you are a blessing!

June 11, 2010 at 10:27 PM  
Blogger Sparkless said...

I love hearing how messy being a farm girl gets. It's only realistic that sometimes things go wrong. You are doing a fantastic job and I very much enjoy reading all about it.

June 11, 2010 at 10:29 PM  
Blogger Dawn Dutton said...

Unless to take chances and try to learn you would always be sitting by the sidelines wondering what if.... You go girl... learn as you go.. I am very proud of all you do and your accomplishments... hang in there... keep learning.. your a inspiration to us who follow you..
blessings and hugs....

June 11, 2010 at 11:04 PM  
Blogger Patsy said...

When is Finn coming home?

June 11, 2010 at 11:22 PM  
Blogger Harpy 101 said...

Mistakes are not crimes.

EVERYBODY makes them. You have the courage and verbal elegance to share your mistakes and regrets, and that takes such grace, such generosity of spirit, Brave Jenna! It's one of the things your readers love about you. Just ONE, but one of the big things.

Your bravery and kindness of spirit shine through-they would not if you didn't have the gumption to "fess up". You make us ALL more able to admit mistakes, to share them out loud, and to be more human and humane with each other.

What a basket of gifts you send from the farm every time you "fess up"! If anybody snarks at it, they just don't appreciate homemade bread. They can go without.

We support your human-ness. And we appreciate you.

June 11, 2010 at 11:26 PM  
Blogger SWEETHEARTS MOM said...

I promise anyone shaking their heads live in the city with no dust and 1.5 children and possibly a small purse dog. good girl. Glad you are slowing down. Can't wait til Gibson takes a piece out of that fox's tail for you. On the rabbits...pick up a bottle of Dri Tail and keep it in your animal first aid box. Treat at the first sign of the runs. It's probably just too much fresh spring grass? Possibly a bug but my bet is grass if you are giving it to them. I am sure you know not to feed anything that makes you have to burp right? Broccoli, cukes, etc? They can't burp.

June 11, 2010 at 11:45 PM  
Blogger Melissa said...

maybe you just need some extra hands. it really seems like a lot for one person, i mean hey, people used to bear children just to have an extra set of hands...just sayin.

June 11, 2010 at 11:46 PM  
Blogger Hunington said...

Don't sweat the Pedantics -- there are always people who cherish the opportunity to correct others. In real life society generally curbs their behavior, but on the net they are rampant because there's no natural brake on their behavior. Easy way to tell the difference between judgment and helpful suggestion: a helpful suggestion is done with love, peace, patience, kindness, joy and understanding. Ignore everything else.

June 12, 2010 at 12:28 AM  
Blogger Toby said...

Jenna,

We got our shipment of mixed heritage breed turkeys from Porter's Wednesday night. They had been in the mail too long (3 days). They were all alive when we picked them up but 9 of 24 have died since. We know it wasn't our fault but we cannot help the guilt we feel.

We thought we'd put our 4 week blue buff orpingtons in with our weeks old mottled javas because we didn't have another brooder ready. 1 died from being trampled.

I left a door open on our chicken run last winter and a coon got one of our astrolorps.

I filled a small water bowl too high and a week old duck drowned.

We started on this life January of last year. You are our sole inspiration for making our way in this world of seeds, birds and bunnies. We have a standard city lot 60'x110' in a small rural town in very northern California.

We're all human. We live, love and screw up frequently.

Still beats the alternative. We will never go back to that life no matter how hard the work is or how difficult the setbacks or sad the loss of animals can be.

Good Luck, Good Spirits, Be Tough

Toby and Amandy
Nine Lives Farm
Loleta CA

June 12, 2010 at 1:18 AM  
Blogger Toby said...

Jenna,

We got our shipment of mixed heritage breed turkeys from Porter's Wednesday night. They had been in the mail too long (3 days). They were all alive when we picked them up but 9 of 24 have died since. We know it wasn't our fault but we cannot help the guilt we feel.

We thought we'd put our 4 week blue buff orpingtons in with our weeks old mottled javas because we didn't have another brooder ready. 1 died from being trampled.

I left a door open on our chicken run last winter and a coon got one of our astrolorps.

I filled a small water bowl too high and a week old duck drowned.

We started on this life January of last year. You are our sole inspiration for making our way in this world of seeds, birds and bunnies. We have a standard city lot 60'x110' in a small rural town in very northern California.

We're all human. We live, love and screw up frequently.

Still beats the alternative. We will never go back to that life no matter how hard the work is or how difficult the setbacks or sad the loss of animals can be.

Good Luck, Good Spirits, Be Tough

Toby and Amandy
Nine Lives Farm
Loleta CA

June 12, 2010 at 1:24 AM  
Blogger Reason's Whore said...

Death is part of life. It's an unpopular notion these days. It's good for people to come in contact with it here.

Glad to hear that you are scaling back a bit. It's tempting to do too much, to acquire more and more animals and put in too many beds in the vegetable garden and so on. Sometimes it's good to step back and analyse what we are doing and why, and whether it makes sense at a particular point. I am speaking from experience here.

June 12, 2010 at 1:41 AM  
Blogger Stargazer 2 said...

Jenna,
I dig ole trucks, & my cousin made the statement that by the time you build your third one you will know what not to do!!! The
same goes for starting a small farm I'm sure, yet a lot of us (your) readers are chomping at the bit to do exactly what you're doing!!! So we'll all hang in there with you, & unfortunately (for you) learn from your learning!!! CHEERS with a health drink!!!
June 11, 2010 @ 3:10 AM EST

June 12, 2010 at 3:11 AM  
Blogger huntb said...

三更燈火五更雞,正是男兒讀書時 ..................................................

June 12, 2010 at 3:52 AM  
Blogger The 4 Bushel Farmgal said...

Jenna,
You talk about mistakes, but I don't see that much of what has happened has been caused by mistakes. It's what happens, that's all. Foxes eat, kits do occassionally get sick, and people fall ill.

"City folk" have things happen, too. But they've come to accept it as "life", not realizing that your lifestyle is just as real, if not more so.

You've done a lot this year. All this and a book, too! You may just need some time to step back, survey what you have, and take care of what needs to be done. Take it easy on yourself. Smile and be proud!

June 12, 2010 at 6:36 AM  
Blogger doglady said...

Your bunnies could very easily be suffering from the same malady you were. It wouldn't hurt to have Dr. Wolsky check one of them for microscopic bad boys. Glad to hear the survivors are on the mend. These things happen. I lost 10 chicks to crows and ravens. I lost 4 good layers to a Goshawk last winter. So far, I think the smell of 3 German Shepherds has kept the coons and foxes away. Farmers always have losses to predators be they wild or domestic.

June 12, 2010 at 6:56 AM  
Blogger Jenna said...

doglady, how did you know my vet?!

And I worried about that too. I am getting my well tested today incase there's bacteria in it. But I think more animals would have perished other than the two bunnies. Time will tell.

June 12, 2010 at 7:19 AM  
Blogger Jenna said...

and finn will be back soon as i can afford the pasture fence installed with electricuty. I can't afford it now.

June 12, 2010 at 7:19 AM  
Blogger Affi'enia said...

I for one like to see the mistakes/problems as much as the good stuff. It's real. I'm getting my first chickens (for egg production not meat) at the end of the month. We hope to move onto meat birds at some point. I'd love for it to all be perfect but I know things will go wrong. So I thank you for showing us all that it's difficult and messy!

June 12, 2010 at 7:35 AM  
Blogger Tracy said...

Learning is a process. Sure, we'd like to know it all at once, but that isn't how life works. Hang in there- you're doing great!

June 12, 2010 at 7:35 AM  
Blogger seagoddess said...

I think your honesty about life on the farm is both endearing and fair. Why shouldn't you share the good and the not so good about this lifestyle? It's real and raw and that's why I so enjoy your blog. Down here in southern New England, we're rooting for you all the way. It's such an inspiration. Keep up the good work - and nothing wrong with getting help from the pros!

June 12, 2010 at 7:52 AM  
Blogger Flartus said...

Even "professional" farmers lose animals to predators and illness. I doubt anyone reading this blog is shaking their head at you, unless it's in sympathy. When I was a kid, we lost our entire rabbit stock to disease, after years of experience raising & butchering them. (We had earlier lost several to a pack of wild dogs, but then our brave, brave rooster drew them off.)

And I once accidentally killed a chicken by slamming its neck in the door of the coop. I still shudder to think of it. But such is life on a farm: alternately beautiful and brutal.

June 12, 2010 at 8:01 AM  
Blogger Crystal said...

Thank you Jenna. I appreciate and admire your honesty. A few weeks ago I lost my first Angora and it was so hard. I felt like such a failure. Other people won't share that losing animals happens in even the best farms (which is where I place yours) and it's hard when setting off to know that it will happen and it's nothing that you do.

Please keep being honest. I'll keep reading.

Crystal

June 12, 2010 at 8:08 AM  
Blogger Tami SouthStreetShabby.blogspot.com said...

Jenna,
Casualties and sickness are part of country life. I grew up in rural CNY and had animals and part of that was learning that death was a natural part of life. Goes hand-in-hand and there is no way around that. Nothing you've talked about smacks of negligence to me...for a single, learning woman, I think you've done a darn good job.
Glad you've decided to scale back a bit. Because, even you, 'Super Jenna' cannot turn 24 hours a day into 36! :-) Keep going, but keep it reasonable.

June 12, 2010 at 8:46 AM  
Blogger Ma said...

If there weren't bumps in the road, we'd never learn any valuable lessons.
I've found farming is a never-ending lesson.
I appreciate your honesty.

June 12, 2010 at 9:06 AM  
Blogger Kris said...

Hey Jenna. I am so glad you are better. I am nursing an infected pinky right now. It's hard to milk with a bad finger. And I am so sorry for all the problems you're having. I know how that is. Seems like there is always something with goats here. But thank goodness for kaopectate and plain yogurt!

I am going this morning to Dunlap, Tn. to pick up 10 Bourbaon Red turkey babies! I have been waiting about a month now. I am so excited to finally get them! I just read about how well yours are doing. I hope I can keep mine healthy and alive. Never have raised turkeys from babies yet.

June 12, 2010 at 9:14 AM  
Blogger doglady said...

I took an educated vet as to who your vet is because I grew up in North Hoosick, my parents used him and he is the closest to you. I drove through Jackson in May and looked for a farm matching your photos. Didn't see one so I guess you are at least not on 22 unless I missed it. It is fun to hear you talk about Cambridge and Whitman's in North Bennington. Someday, I may run into you in one of these places when I'm visiting Dad.

June 12, 2010 at 9:41 AM  
Blogger doglady said...

That should have read "educated guess". I also lost a whole litter of Silver Fox Rabbit kits because it was too cold for them. This raising your own food etc isn't for the faint of heart. You're doing fine

June 12, 2010 at 10:10 AM  
Blogger Sarah Sanders said...

For me, your honesty and openness helps me tremendously - it makes me realize that sometimes "stuff" just happens and that it's ok - like you said, it's all part of the learning process. I appreciate that you sharing even the difficult things - it gives me the courage to keep trying!
Hang in there, Girl!

June 12, 2010 at 10:11 AM  
Blogger damnyankee said...

Its a farm for chrisstakes. Everything lives and then dies. Just like real life. Sometimes from natural causes but on a farm most likely its either harvested for food or a preditor takes it. This is life on a farm. I know you take excellent care of your animals. That you want them to have lived their best life if and when they are put on a table for food. I know they aren't standing in their own feces or trapped in cages or pens and can't even turn around. Sometimes they get sick -- shit happens. Don't be so tough on yourself. You're doing a wonderful job. I read somewhere that if you're judging people you don't have time to love them....

June 12, 2010 at 10:12 AM  
Blogger Jackie said...

I had 500 does( and some bucks)as my 4-H project when I was a girl. I learned rapidly that rabbits can be touchy critters. Just when all the flock looks and sounds grand, someone does something/catches something and you are battling for their lives. What bothered me the most was the does eating their young. That did and still does gross me out.

June 12, 2010 at 12:22 PM  
Blogger My Ugly Garden said...

Never apologize for telling the truth. Your honest posts have helped me form realistic expectations for my own place, not the romanticized image that can come with the word "farm" or "self reliance". Thank you and wish you all the best.

June 12, 2010 at 12:27 PM  
Blogger Summermelonfarm said...

I love that you are honest! Farming is not as "romantic" as some people think. (Rainbows and alpacas, that would be my romantic farm. ;)You really have to do it to know what it is like and I haven't read a better book, blog, or website than yours about REAL farming. Thank you for including the good, bad, and ugly, though most days are heaven, I know. :)

June 12, 2010 at 12:38 PM  
Blogger Karen said...

Your own tartan! I'll bet you could design one. It would have to have black and white in it, for Gibson and the sheep. Maybe some rust for the chickens. Neat project to think about.
I too, appreciate your honesty. Sometimes, people get the "pie in the sky" view of farming and are very dissappointed in reality. Better that readers should know what it takes. And you are just the person that it takes!

June 12, 2010 at 12:44 PM  
Blogger hlbrack said...

If you never made mistakes you'd never gain success! I appreciate your honesty in regards to CAF - you tell it like it is! And you are doing marvelously. Keep up the great work, Jenna.

June 12, 2010 at 1:09 PM  
Blogger beansprout said...

There's always going to be a learning curve. If people don't understand that then they are living in a fantasy world. I appreciate you're sharing, Jenna, I really do. It makes me feel just a little less defeated when I find a week old peep drowned in a bucket of water or lose my entire batch of angora kits. We do the best we can and leave the rest up to nature. That's life. It sucks some times but the next time around, we know better. Thanks for sharing the 'bad' as well as the good.

June 12, 2010 at 2:53 PM  
Blogger SadeRa盈君iford0412 said...

ut網際空間聊天ut 網際空間聊天高聊天室ut男同聊天同志聊天至免費線上貼圖免費線上愛影片免費線上影片a片免費線上影片網免費線上影片論壇免費觀看卡通色情片免費觀看台灣片交流網吻技完全免費成人網宏耶宏椰的家宏爺宏爺網站宏爺影城我78我愛78免費我愛78論談我愛87論壇我愛論壇找妹做愛即時通辣妹利特利的遊戲免費觀看成人卡通影片免費觀看成人電影淫蕩學生妹ut美女聊天室無碼影片無碼影片

June 12, 2010 at 3:06 PM  
Blogger miz hannahlu said...

I agree with many of the previous commenters...last night, i was gently pulling a bow across fiddle strings, and some semblence of a tune emmanated.this after a grueling 12hr day on my feet caring for sick patients. a year ago, a talented, can-do young blog writer inspired me to try the seemingly impossible- learn the violin as an already-overloaded mother and fulltime geriatric nurse. so guess what? i bought a used violin on EBay and the fiddle book, and no, it didn't happen that summer by July 4th, but slowly over the months, it has happened for me. Despite some eye-rolling from coworkers and my teenaged son (a talented cellist, i might add),i can make rudimentary music. yes, all your talents and accomplishments awe this reader, but what brings me back to follow your adventures is not only damn fine writing, but the fact that you are not an elitist and encourage baby-stepping for ALL of us. I am relieved and heartened that you seem to be extending this same kindness to yourself- that you are not "behind", and you are NOT failing by supporting your local corn farmer this year!

June 12, 2010 at 7:25 PM  
Blogger Silent said...

Whenever you can sit back and say you know it all and can do whatever you can on the farm is the day your interest in it will begin to wane and the farm will become a chore to be done and not a pleasure to experience. Don't lose heart, Jenna. Keep at it and keep learning. That was my great grandmother's motto and she lived to a ripe old age of 97, though she'd kick my butt for using the word "ripe."

June 12, 2010 at 9:55 PM  
Blogger Silent said...

Whenever you can sit back and say you know it all and can do whatever you can on the farm is the day your interest in it will begin to wane and the farm will become a chore to be done and not a pleasure to experience. Don't lose heart, Jenna. Keep at it and keep learning. That was my great grandmother's motto and she lived to a ripe old age of 97, though she'd kick my butt for using the word "ripe."

June 12, 2010 at 9:55 PM  
Blogger Paula said...

Jenna- I am glad that you're easing off and cutting back a little- sounds like you're being more realistic with yourself. You will do everything you want to do, eventually, but you're still learning, and like they say- Rome wasn't built in a day.

One thing I learned years ago in the Big Corporate World is that you'll build greater success by levering your strengths, rather than trying to develop your weaknesses. So once you get one ability under your belt, you can grab the next goal and work on that. You'll be a lot happier with yourself accomplishing one goal well and moving on to the next than failing at a few different things you tried to start all at once.

I don't think any of your readers expects you to do it all right from the beginning, so don't feel like you have to live up to our expectations. You gotta remember, a lot of us are living the farm life vicariously through you, so we all want you to have a happy ending. A lot of that hinges on being realistic about what one person can do, especially when she's still learning a lot of it.

That said, I'm glad you're ratcheting back; sounds pretty mature and level-headed to me.

June 13, 2010 at 3:15 AM  
Blogger Michelle said...

Farm life is messy. Beautiful and messy! That's just the way it is. And anyone who is critical of your honesty is ignorant of these realities and filled with romantical thinking. Keep doing what your doing. Your honesty is refreshing and eye opening. It's a beautiful life and thank you for sharing.

June 13, 2010 at 12:52 PM  
Blogger thimblevee said...

No judgement from here - just disappointment for you. And thinking that I'm happy to hear you decide to "slow down a little". You really have bitten off a big plug and its OKAY to slow down - you gotta take care of JENNA too! Anybody out there who isn't making mistakes, isn't doing much!! Keep up the good work and the blog just like it is! Life is reality and sometimes it just frankly sucks! But you concentrate on the things you can do something about and don't dwell on the things beyond your power!

June 14, 2010 at 10:58 AM  
OpenID thatsthelife said...

Keep it up, Jenna.

Honesty is what we crave as blog readers, and what I aspire to as a blog writer. If all we hear is the good stuff, we *know* there's some bad stuff getting edited out, and that unknown makes achieving a similar self-reliant life seem scary and further away than it really is.

Your honesty helps us understand what's hard and what's wonderful; and it helps us decide what we can realistically tackle ourselves.

Bless you for sharing your mistakes Jenna - we all get to learn from them!

Why just today I was re-reading your book and mulling over the temptation to buy a bunch of pretty veggies rather than practical ones. Because I don't know what I'd do with a bushel of yellow zucchini, I'm planing tomatoes instead.

Everyone learns by doing, and your honestly helps us learn along with you, reducing the mistakes made by newbie homesteaders overall.

You're a leader of our back-to-basics, homesteader generation of survivalists. I admire and am grateful for your bravery.

June 14, 2010 at 11:36 AM  
Blogger thedoza said...

I bought two meat rabbits right after you did. I bred them and both of them had their babies on the wire despite the nest boxes. Both litters died. It was terrible. Did I learn from it? Hell yes. Will I try again, of course. I learned that from you, Jenna.

Thank you for blazing the trail.
Naomi in Eugene

June 14, 2010 at 2:03 PM  
Blogger cindycolombo said...

We just got our first breeding pair of meat rabbits this weekend. I didn't know about not feeding them broccoli or cucs is there anything else to stay away from?
Thanks!

June 14, 2010 at 2:16 PM  
OpenID ruralaspirations said...

That's what I love about your posts, seeing you learning as you go. Gawd knows we'll be making our fair share of mistakes - we're as green as they come. But learning is part of the journey of life, isn't it? Hang in there, you are doing great!

June 16, 2010 at 1:44 AM  
Blogger Music In Danville said...

Hi Jenna, sorry to post so late, but I'm just catching up on your life after getting busy myself a year ago. I'm a small animal veterinarian, and have seen a good bit of this bacteria under my diagnostic microscope. A good eye and a little stain on the slide can pick up these darting spirochetes by their motion and activity; then you can confirm with a test if you want.
Campylobacter is a zoonotic, so there's a chance you swapped it with your bunnies, or they gave it to you. And your new pup is also suspect, with the stress of shipping and all. I've treated cats with campylobacter who had diarrhea but not overwhelming illness. My feeling is they were simply better able to handle the bacteria. I had it once and it kept me very close to the BR but not horizontally ill. And I've had salmonella which gripped my stomach like a vice and kept me on the couch - that came from frozen Tyson chicken years before I became a vet.
I wholeheartedly agree with your readers that this could have come from *anywhere*. Don't second guess your cleaning skills and DON'T buy a bucketload of chemical cleaners to compensate. I'm a vinegar and water gal too, and since I stopped poisoning my environment with chemicals I have not had a single flu, cold/virus or food-borne illness. I believe my system is stronger now and more able to deal with the bugs I encounter.
I *firmly* believe that my low-stress, free-roaming back yard chickens DO NOT fall into the category of bacteria-laden birds that you find in production growing. I have many folks who use my eggs raw, and I don't worry. And no one's ever come up sick.
If this happens again, cull a bird and send it to your state diagnostic lab for testing. It'll likely put your mind at ease.
I'm glad I found your blog again (search Jenna and blog and chickens and there you are!)-- I've recently moved for a job and left my BYCs behind in NC with a housemate. My MO rental is in a town that doesn't allow BYC, and I'm debating going undercover. But I digress -- it's good to read your blog again and I look forward to catching up on the past several months over the next few days.
Linda
PS The Music In Danville moniker is old - I used to host house concerts in an old Victorian when I lived there in 2003-2005. Updating my blog identity is at the bottom of my ToDo list! But we have OT music in common.

March 20, 2011 at 12:49 PM  

Post a Comment

Links to this post:

Create a Link

<< Home